Search Results: "Marcia Brown"


BOOK REVIEW

HENRY-FISHERMAN by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1949

"Henry is a little dark skinned native boy, and the story of his daily round, of his aspirations to go out with his father in the fishing boat, and of what happens when he finally goes, is told with the lilt of the islanders' language, and a confident feel of background, and use of the details children like to know about distant places."
Picture book format with too much text for the picture story book age, so try in this section. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLYING CARPET by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1956

"Very firm spine."
One of the 1001 tales from the Arabian Nights- the story of the Princes Husayn, Ali and Ahmad and their quest for the hand of Princess Nur-al Nihar- is retold with a direct simplicity from the Burton translation and illustrated in swirling, glowing eastern line and color by Miss Brown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUSS IN BOOTS by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1952

If you can ignore (as children will) the complete lack of any moral lesson in this story of the cunning cheat, Puss in Boots, you will chuckle inwardly at the somewhat sophisticated free translation from Charles Perrault — along with the very continental flavor of the illustrations by the translator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEIGHBORS by Marcia Brown
Released: Oct. 1, 1967

"It's nicely told but doesn't bear watching."
From the back of a classroom, these Strident, overscaled, hyperactive illustrations might look just great; at close range they're almost uniformly grotesque. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAMARINDO! by Marcia Brown
Released: Oct. 3, 1960

"A lyrical story which sustains suspense and excitement without sacrificing its characteristic delicacy."
A little Sicilian boy, Pepineddu, is the captain of a troop of soldiers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1954

"Gentle."
This companion piece to the other fairy tales Marcia Brown has interpreted (see Puss In Boots, 1952, p. 548 and others) has the smoothness of a good translation and a unique charm to her feathery light pictures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPER JOHN'S COOK by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1951

"Second and third year reading."
By the author of Dick Whittington and His Cat (1950) and Henry-Fisherman (1949) a delightful sea and salt air picture book about a cocky Provincetown boy who shipped out as a cook for the crew of a bean-weary fishing boat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 16, 1972

"The crudely contrasting colors and broad, chop-licking expressions suit this version to group consumption; close up, Holdsworth's Gingerbread Boy (1968) is more sustaining."
Cousin to the more familiar gingerbread boy, a round and smiling bun of dough and sour cream successfully evades an old woman, old man, hare, wolf, and bear before a fox, pretending interest in his boasting song, flatters him nearer and nearer. . . then "Snap! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE CAROUSEL by Marcia Brown
Released: Nov. 1, 1946

"This tells how he got his ride."
This is an attractive little story and a gay picture book, with spirited drawings in color by the author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT by Marcia Brown
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 14, 1950

"More or less of a carriage trade item."
Hanso cuts — stylized with a witty flair-enliven the beloved old story of the cat and the balls that called Dick Whittington back to London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PETER PIPER'S ALPHABET by Marcia Brown
Released: Aug. 5, 1959

"Illustrated in vivid color drawings by Marcia Brown which capture the abandon of the one hundred and forty year old English text, this book teaches its valuable lesson through whimsy and inventiveness."
Based on the Peter Piper rhyme, this book takes the reader on a colorful tour of his alphabet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STONE SOUP by Marcia Brown
Kirkus Star
illustrated by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1947

"Gay soldiers in red coats and impressive looking hate, children, animals, cobbled streets and a French village feel make this a pleasant choice for a gift book- as well as worth while for a permanent library shelf."
Retelling of a folk tale which is as flavorsome as the soup it tells about. Read full book review >