Search Results: "Marcus Burke"


BOOK REVIEW

TEAM SEVEN by Marcus Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 2014

"Burke crafts a street-smart tale of the possibilities and temptations of growing up. There is power in his words, and the tale moves like a locomotive right to the end."
A wonderful debut novel that moves with the rhythm of the streets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOW PUPPY by Marcus Pfister
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"This nicely captures a puppy's (or a child's) distractibility, and the Christmas tie-in adds the moral that Pfister's books never lack. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Pfister gets into the head and heart of a puppy experiencing the wonders of his first snow, as well as the heartache of his first time being lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERTIE AT BEDTIME by Marcus Pfister
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2008

"Gentle, sweet and endearing, but hardly unique. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bertie the Hippo wants Daddy to play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 29, 1979

"Rockwell's grown-up approach gives some hope that rock criticism can some day be rich, varied, substantial; as of now, on the fairly representative evidence here, it's kid stuff all the way."
The premise of this book was simple: ask twenty writers what rock and roll record they would take to a desert island." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLY, LITTLE BIRD by Tina Burke
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"Pre-readers and readers alike will enjoy this visual treat that tickles the funny bone while providing a tender reflection on friendship. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In her debut, Burke offers readers the essence of picture book: a nearly wordless work for which she relies on her expressive watercolors to tell the tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF DEAD DAYS by Marcus Sedgwick
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 12, 2004

"Much is left untold in this fascinatingly brooding tale, but Boy discovers in a final burst of warmth that Willow will be with him whatever his future holds. (author's note) (Fantasy. YA)"
In an 18th-century European city that's grand but decaying, a desperate and mysterious quest occurs during the year's "Dead Days." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST GANG IN TOWN by Marcus Gray
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gray's smug, repetitive prose utterly fails to put the Clash in a coherent context the way Jon Savage's towering England's Dreaming did for the Sex Pistols. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A hopelessly rambling and combative biography of the seminal punk band. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Touching, lyrical, and often humorous. (Author tour)"
Another entry in what will no doubt be a long series of autobiographies by postbaby boom African-Americans helps place a new generation of memoirists on solid ground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD PEOPLES by Marcus Major
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2000

"Major, with a gift for dialogue, creates an amiable work—though small in scale, it serves as a companionable distraction into the territory of romantic love."
A first novel, set in African-American and Latino communities, that offers some heartfelt insights gleaned from the bumpy road of courtship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Tanner's concurrent personal explorations of the real and symbolic Irish landscapes bring an immediacy to this ancient fight. Unfortunately, such immediacy doesn't lend much hope for a solution ere long."
Tanner (Croatia, 1997, etc.) painstakingly scrutinizes the Irish struggles of the last half-millennium through the lens of religion, which by necessity brings to bear facets of ideology, class, politics, and the distribution of wealth and power. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTABLE AMERICAN WOMEN by Ben Marcus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 2002

"Dazzling, genius-driven—and, alas, often tedious."
Marcus follows up his extraordinary The Age of Wire and String (1995) with something of a disappointment. The verbal wizardry is still there, but the content has grown coquettish and slightened, no longer an engine sufficient to drive the whole. Read full book review >