Search Results: "Margaret Atwood"


BOOK REVIEW

HAG-SEED by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Deliberate and carefully built, this novel rarely pulls off true theater's magic of transforming glitter confetti into fairy dust."
Despite its title, this novelization of The Tempest explores the perspective not of Caliban, the enslaved witch's son, but of Prospero, his magician master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"Wholly satisfying, with plenty of insights for Atwood and sci-fi fans alike."
A witty, astute collection of essays and lectures on science fiction by the acclaimed novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD BONES AND SIMPLE MURDERS by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Readers will resent paying what averages out to about ten dollars per hour for this."
Atwood (The Robber Bride, 1993, etc.) is always at her worst when her acerbic sneer overwhelms other elements, and there is barely room for anything else in these short-short works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1985

"Tinny perhaps, but still a minutely rendered and impressively steady feminist vision of apocalypse."
The time is the not-so-distant future, when the US's spiraling social freedoms have finally called down a reaction, an Iranian-style repressive "monotheocracy" calling itself the Republic of Gilead—a Bible-thumping, racist, capital-punishing, and misogynistic rule that would do away with pleasure altogether were it not for one thing: that the Gileadan women, pure and true (as opposed to all the nonbelieving women, those who've ever been adulterous or married more than once), are found rarely fertile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORYX AND CRAKE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 6, 2003

"A landmark work of speculative fiction, comparable to A Clockwork Orange, Brave New World, and Russian revolutionary Zamyatin's We. Atwood has surpassed herself."
Environmental unconcern, genetic engineering, and bioterrorism have created the hollowed-out, haunted future world of Atwood's ingenious and disturbing 11th novel, bearing several resemblances to The Handmaid's Tale (1985). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODILY HARM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 1982

"Still: strong work, reflecting a powerfully bleak vision—though too obvious and linear for fully satisfying fiction."
Rennie is a free-lance Toronto journalist in her thirties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIFE BEFORE MAN by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1979

"Monumentally depressing, thoroughly gifted work from a very special novelist."
If there are such things as "poet's novels," Margaret Atwood writes them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEART GOES LAST by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"As one of a small group of authors who won literary credibility for dystopian fiction, Atwood has taught her readers to expect better."
Dystopian clichés are played as farce in this nasty tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 19, 2005

"For the die-hard fan."
Frothy, courtly occasional pieces from Booker-winning Atwood (The Blind Assassin, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1983

"In sum: a generous yet lightweight assemblage, with little interest to those not specializing in Canadian literature."
Canadian novelist/poet Atwood makes no large claims for the reviews and talks collected in this bulky volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY ORACLE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1976

"Lady Oracle's automatic reading—a charming certainty."
There were those who admired The Edible Woman, while Surfacing—post-discovery chic?—attracted still more attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TENT by Margaret Atwood
Released: Jan. 10, 2006

"If Atwood's name weren't attached, no publisher would bother putting this trivia between book covers."
Top-of-the-head riffs, the majority occupying a peculiar middle ground between fiction and allegory, from the Canadian novelist (Oryx and Crake, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >