Search Results: "Margaret Atwood"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"Wholly satisfying, with plenty of insights for Atwood and sci-fi fans alike."
A witty, astute collection of essays and lectures on science fiction by the acclaimed novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD BONES AND SIMPLE MURDERS by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Readers will resent paying what averages out to about ten dollars per hour for this."
Atwood (The Robber Bride, 1993, etc.) is always at her worst when her acerbic sneer overwhelms other elements, and there is barely room for anything else in these short-short works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAG-SEED by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Deliberate and carefully built, this novel rarely pulls off true theater's magic of transforming glitter confetti into fairy dust."
Despite its title, this novelization of The Tempest explores the perspective not of Caliban, the enslaved witch's son, but of Prospero, his magician master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1985

"Tinny perhaps, but still a minutely rendered and impressively steady feminist vision of apocalypse."
The time is the not-so-distant future, when the US's spiraling social freedoms have finally called down a reaction, an Iranian-style repressive "monotheocracy" calling itself the Republic of Gilead—a Bible-thumping, racist, capital-punishing, and misogynistic rule that would do away with pleasure altogether were it not for one thing: that the Gileadan women, pure and true (as opposed to all the nonbelieving women, those who've ever been adulterous or married more than once), are found rarely fertile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TENT by Margaret Atwood
Released: Jan. 10, 2006

"If Atwood's name weren't attached, no publisher would bother putting this trivia between book covers."
Top-of-the-head riffs, the majority occupying a peculiar middle ground between fiction and allegory, from the Canadian novelist (Oryx and Crake, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT'S EYE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1988

"All the better Atwood trademarks are here—wry humor, unforgiving detailed observation, a tart prose style—and likely to attract a wide audience."
Atwood's wide-screen, cautionary Handmaid's Tale (1986) confirmed the author's place in the major leagues, and here she follows up with a work of intensity and tart wit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUEBEARD'S EGG by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1986

"Through most of Atwood's undistinguished second collection of short fiction runs her feminist sense of angst and alienation; occasional stabs at mitigating humor mostly miss their mark."
Atwood (Life Before Man, Bodily Harm, The Handmaid's Tale, etc.) here adds two new stories to a collection first published in her native Canada in 1983. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SURFACING by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1973

"Miss Atwood is a remarkable writer with a style that's clear and clean and close to the bone but since her heroine is so exempt from feeling, it still remains a kind of suicide chic even where she distances beyond those lost causes (the ecology, liberation, etc.) we consider fashionable."
Themes of some of her poems — a "universe. . . that survives only by devouring parts of itself," and man or woman as a lonely and primeval (often "furry") animal — are all part of this novel which is as charged and delusional as the talented Edible Woman although her heroine, a young woman whose life becomes a repudiation of it, is far less appealing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALIAS GRACE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Through characteristically elegant prose and a mix of narrative techniques, Atwood not only crafts an eerie, unsettling tale of murder and obsession, but also a stunning portrait of the lives of women in another time."
A fascinating elaboration—and somewhat of a departure for Atwood (The Robber Bride, 1993, etc.)—of the life of Grace Marks, one of Canada's more infamous killers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADDADDAM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"By no means her finest work, but Atwood remains an expert thinker about human foibles and how they might play out on a grand scale."
Atwood closes her post-apocalyptic trilogy (Oryx and Crake, 2003; The Year of the Flood, 2009) with a study of a small camp of survivors, redolent with suggestions about how new-world mythologies are made. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1989 by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1989

"Meanwhile, Rick DeMarinis, in 'The Flowers of Boredom,' does provide a context for his story—a defense contractor—that is very different, the world of work separated from the other stories' more common private emotions; and it oddly serves to make the rest seem fairly hothouse-ish by comparison."
Novelist Atwood writes a mild, conventional introduction to her choices for this year's Best, which themselves are mostly mild and conventional stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODILY HARM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 1982

"Still: strong work, reflecting a powerfully bleak vision—though too obvious and linear for fully satisfying fiction."
Rennie is a free-lance Toronto journalist in her thirties. Read full book review >