Search Results: "Margaret Atwood"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1985

"Tinny perhaps, but still a minutely rendered and impressively steady feminist vision of apocalypse."
The time is the not-so-distant future, when the US's spiraling social freedoms have finally called down a reaction, an Iranian-style repressive "monotheocracy" calling itself the Republic of Gilead—a Bible-thumping, racist, capital-punishing, and misogynistic rule that would do away with pleasure altogether were it not for one thing: that the Gileadan women, pure and true (as opposed to all the nonbelieving women, those who've ever been adulterous or married more than once), are found rarely fertile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIFE BEFORE MAN by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1979

"Monumentally depressing, thoroughly gifted work from a very special novelist."
If there are such things as "poet's novels," Margaret Atwood writes them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODILY HARM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 1982

"Still: strong work, reflecting a powerfully bleak vision—though too obvious and linear for fully satisfying fiction."
Rennie is a free-lance Toronto journalist in her thirties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCING GIRLS by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 1982

"Still, the story form finally seems a little inhospitable to Atwood's unsparingly discomforting talent, which benefits most from a poem's distillation or a novel's large clemency; and these pieces, too short for real development but long enough to become terribly dreary, offer only flickering evidence of Atwood's substantial gifts."
The themes are quintessentially Atwoodian: a little terror, a lot of ennui, and women's hunger for exactly the things they detest most (or so they think). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SURFACING by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1973

"Miss Atwood is a remarkable writer with a style that's clear and clean and close to the bone but since her heroine is so exempt from feeling, it still remains a kind of suicide chic even where she distances beyond those lost causes (the ecology, liberation, etc.) we consider fashionable."
Themes of some of her poems — a "universe. . . that survives only by devouring parts of itself," and man or woman as a lonely and primeval (often "furry") animal — are all part of this novel which is as charged and delusional as the talented Edible Woman although her heroine, a young woman whose life becomes a repudiation of it, is far less appealing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUEBEARD'S EGG by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1986

"Through most of Atwood's undistinguished second collection of short fiction runs her feminist sense of angst and alienation; occasional stabs at mitigating humor mostly miss their mark."
Atwood (Life Before Man, Bodily Harm, The Handmaid's Tale, etc.) here adds two new stories to a collection first published in her native Canada in 1983. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 19, 2005

"For the die-hard fan."
Frothy, courtly occasional pieces from Booker-winning Atwood (The Blind Assassin, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1983

"In sum: a generous yet lightweight assemblage, with little interest to those not specializing in Canadian literature."
Canadian novelist/poet Atwood makes no large claims for the reviews and talks collected in this bulky volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY ORACLE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1976

"Lady Oracle's automatic reading—a charming certainty."
There were those who admired The Edible Woman, while Surfacing—post-discovery chic?—attracted still more attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROBBER BRIDE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1993

"Amusing sometimes, but flogged and padded—hardly one of Atwood's better efforts."
Antonia (Tony), Karen (Charis), and Roz are three 50-ish Toronto friends, pals since college, all of whom have had to negotiate (and none too well) the treacheries of another friend, Zenia—someone who in the past has stolen a significant man from each of the others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 16, 1968

"The poems, on a variety of miniatured subjects, are both oblique in intent and attractively crystalline in expression."
These generally brief poems peregrinate wittily—an impression of discoveries as neat and exquisite as the calligraphy of fox footprints in the snow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADDADDAM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"By no means her finest work, but Atwood remains an expert thinker about human foibles and how they might play out on a grand scale."
Atwood closes her post-apocalyptic trilogy (Oryx and Crake, 2003; The Year of the Flood, 2009) with a study of a small camp of survivors, redolent with suggestions about how new-world mythologies are made. Read full book review >