Search Results: "Margaret Atwood"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1985

"Tinny perhaps, but still a minutely rendered and impressively steady feminist vision of apocalypse."
The time is the not-so-distant future, when the US's spiraling social freedoms have finally called down a reaction, an Iranian-style repressive "monotheocracy" calling itself the Republic of Gilead—a Bible-thumping, racist, capital-punishing, and misogynistic rule that would do away with pleasure altogether were it not for one thing: that the Gileadan women, pure and true (as opposed to all the nonbelieving women, those who've ever been adulterous or married more than once), are found rarely fertile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD BONES AND SIMPLE MURDERS by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Readers will resent paying what averages out to about ten dollars per hour for this."
Atwood (The Robber Bride, 1993, etc.) is always at her worst when her acerbic sneer overwhelms other elements, and there is barely room for anything else in these short-short works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODILY HARM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 1982

"Still: strong work, reflecting a powerfully bleak vision—though too obvious and linear for fully satisfying fiction."
Rennie is a free-lance Toronto journalist in her thirties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORYX AND CRAKE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 6, 2003

"A landmark work of speculative fiction, comparable to A Clockwork Orange, Brave New World, and Russian revolutionary Zamyatin's We. Atwood has surpassed herself."
Environmental unconcern, genetic engineering, and bioterrorism have created the hollowed-out, haunted future world of Atwood's ingenious and disturbing 11th novel, bearing several resemblances to The Handmaid's Tale (1985). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SURFACING by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1973

"Miss Atwood is a remarkable writer with a style that's clear and clean and close to the bone but since her heroine is so exempt from feeling, it still remains a kind of suicide chic even where she distances beyond those lost causes (the ecology, liberation, etc.) we consider fashionable."
Themes of some of her poems — a "universe. . . that survives only by devouring parts of itself," and man or woman as a lonely and primeval (often "furry") animal — are all part of this novel which is as charged and delusional as the talented Edible Woman although her heroine, a young woman whose life becomes a repudiation of it, is far less appealing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EDIBLE WOMAN by Margaret Atwood
Released: Oct. 5, 1970

"For its intelligence gentled by sympathy, its eye for telltale detail, and its humor which ranges from wit to some waywardly funny scenes—a distinct pleasure to read."
This is a first novel of genuine style applied to the most ordinary circumstances. . . disconcerting, faintly ominous, and moving with the greatest of ease from the expected to the unexpected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUEBEARD'S EGG by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1986

"Through most of Atwood's undistinguished second collection of short fiction runs her feminist sense of angst and alienation; occasional stabs at mitigating humor mostly miss their mark."
Atwood (Life Before Man, Bodily Harm, The Handmaid's Tale, etc.) here adds two new stories to a collection first published in her native Canada in 1983. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALIAS GRACE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Through characteristically elegant prose and a mix of narrative techniques, Atwood not only crafts an eerie, unsettling tale of murder and obsession, but also a stunning portrait of the lives of women in another time."
A fascinating elaboration—and somewhat of a departure for Atwood (The Robber Bride, 1993, etc.)—of the life of Grace Marks, one of Canada's more infamous killers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORAL DISORDER by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 19, 2006

"Crisp prose, vivid detail and imagery and a rich awareness of the unity of human generations, people and animals, and Nell's own exterior and inmost selves, make this one of Atwood's most accessible and engaging works yet."
The stages of a woman's life and loves are presented in 11 elegantly linked episodes, in the Booker-winning Canadian author's latest collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADDADDAM by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"By no means her finest work, but Atwood remains an expert thinker about human foibles and how they might play out on a grand scale."
Atwood closes her post-apocalyptic trilogy (Oryx and Crake, 2003; The Year of the Flood, 2009) with a study of a small camp of survivors, redolent with suggestions about how new-world mythologies are made. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STONE MATTRESS by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"Up to her old tricks and not dropping a card."
Clever tales about writers, lovers and other weirdos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 16, 1968

"The poems, on a variety of miniatured subjects, are both oblique in intent and attractively crystalline in expression."
These generally brief poems peregrinate wittily—an impression of discoveries as neat and exquisite as the calligraphy of fox footprints in the snow. Read full book review >