Search Results: "Margaret Klaw"


BOOK REVIEW

KEEPING IT CIVIL by Margaret Klaw
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"An accessible description of an intricate field of law, examined in an open-hearted style."
A lawyer specializing in family law relates, with appropriate redactions, some unhappy war stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Effectively told, although Klaw is too busy praising Oneida life for its liberalness to grasp the parallels to modern religious cults, including the Branch Davidians. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
Disturbing tale of a 19th-century utopian community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHOSE SHOE? by Margaret Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 1991

"Again, clear, bright photos and felicitous organization make this an excellent concept book for young children. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 2-7)"
In the same winning format as Whose Hat? (1988), nine varied shoes (clown, ballet, flipper, horseshoe, etc.) are shown in use by the appropriate adult (except the baby shoe!) and also by a child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

Emma and her family celebrate Hanukkah in the usual manner- -polishing the menorah, lighting the lights, playing dreidel with cousins, and eating latkes and chocolate ``Hanukkah gelt.'' As Christmas nears, Emma and her family practice its customary rituals as well, picking the perfect tree—just right for Emma's favorite ornament—decorating it with friends while sharing an assortment of holiday cookies, and then lighting the lights again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE DOES IT GO? by Margaret Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 16, 1992

``Where does Tavo put his socks? Read full book review >

BLOG POST

7 SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS HEADING TO FILM AND TV
by John DeNardo

You've seen 7 Fantasy Novels Heading to Film and TV. Now let's take a look at the science fiction books coming your way…

 

Coyote by Allen Steele

Last month, I recommended you read Allen Steele's Captain Future origin story Avengers of the Moon. You should also check out his back catalog for his Coyote series, which ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 31, 2007

"A much-needed glossary at the back defines some of the colorful and consistently used fairy slang. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
This sequel to A Mid-Semester Night's Dream (2004) takes a humorous yet recognizable look at young teens' trials, tribulations and friendships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CELIA’S ROBOT by Margaret Chang
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2009

"A bit of mystery plus solidly believable, complex friend-family relationships and a smart girl who's fearless about technology make for an appealing light read. (Science fiction. 9-12)"
Celia's cellist (Caucasian) mom and inventor (Chinese-American) dad are loving, busy parents whose work and travel mean less time for hand-holding over school and home routines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGICIAN OF HOAD by Margaret Mahy
FANTASY
Released: Nov. 10, 2009

"Some deep and quenching revelations arrive, finally, but this poetically cryptic prose is for readers who prefer adult fare. (Fantasy. 15 & up)"
Abstraction and surrealism pull this fantasy almost all the way into the adult section. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUT I DON’T WANT TO BE A MOVIE STAR by Margaret Pinder
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2006

"Although Katriona's physical transformation is far-fetched, Katriona's development into a likable character, a character with which teen readers can relate, is natural and believable. (Fiction. YA)"
Summering in tony Palm Desert, Calif., would agree with most people, but for skateboarder chick Katriona Shaw, who's stuck in paradise with her glamorous film-star grandmother, Noni, it couldn't be worse and her running acerbic commentary, which borders on whining, never lets readers forget it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MID-SEMESTER NIGHT’S DREAM by Margaret Meacham
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"But again, the anti-climactic final chapters suffer from over-explanation, awkward prose, and a missing charm that plagues the first half like the goofed-up love spells plaguing the fictional romances. (Fiction. 10-13)"
William Shakespeare's magical love mix-up, A Midsummer Night's Dream, becomes an essentially un-enchanting send-up for middle-graders in this contemporary, hi-lo reader interpretation. Read full book review >