Search Results: "Margaret Mead"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 13, 1972

"Miss Mead is not one to be caught in a category and these reflections on a long productive life have the flavor of youthful beginnings."
For me, being brought up to become a woman who could live responsibly in the contemporary world and learning to become an anthropologist, conscious of the culture in which I lived, were almost the same thing." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUTH BENEDICT by Margaret Mead
Released: Sept. 1, 1974

"Mead's portrait is followed by a selection from the essential Benedict (on cultural configurations, Zuni mythology, primitive freedom, Japanese self-discipline) which reveal her as lucid, seminal, humane, and very much the writer she always wanted to be."
This is a volume in the Leaders of Modern Anthropology series, and as such it is an introduction to Ruth Benedict as a thinker and a human being, not a full-scale biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 11, 1942

"She writes extremely well, making something which sounds abstract, theoretical, limited, of immediacy and interest to all."
A sharp, discerning and quite fascinating study of the character structure of America, what we are ourselves, what made us this way and what we have which will enable us to win the war and form the postwar world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MALE AND FEMALE by Margaret Mead
Released: Oct. 20, 1929

Sub-titled "A Study of the Sexes in a Changing World", this tri-partite analysis, based on anthropological insights, examines firstly the differences and the similarities of the bodies of human beings on which our concepts of sex are built; secondly the problems of sex in society, in family life; and finally, the sexes in contemporary America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 9, 1969

"Perhaps the real point is that the word 'generation' has lost meaning and we must substitute a new term for groups only five or six years apart who act as the links between those who came before and those who come after."
"The future is now," Margaret Mead says as the coda of her series of three essays developed from the Man and Nature lectures at the American Museum of Natural History. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 25, 1939

"Item for public and college libraries."
Combining three books in one volume:- Coming of Age in Samoa, Growing Up in New Guinea, Sex and Temperament. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 24, 1935

"In the light of her findings, she gives a new slant on human behavior."
Her first book, Coming of Age in Samoa, proved a bone of contention and aroused wide interest, in those concerned with social problems and anthropology. Dr. Mead has a faculty for getting at modern and current problems in our own civilization through a close study of primitive people, tribes of New Guinea, devoid of any pretense of the veneer of civilization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEOPLE AND PLACES by Margaret Mead
Released: Oct. 19, 1959

"And it all reads with the ease of practised travel through the world of man."
In an excellent series that includes such distinguished books as Craven's Rainbow Book of Art and Peattie's Rainbow Book of Nature, this book by America's most distinguished anthropologist is outstanding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAGON AND THE STAR by Margaret Mead
Released: Oct. 30, 1967

"Not a compendium, or comprehensive; a supplementary casebook for activists."
An author combine of cultural anthropologist and psychologist promulgates some general and specific truths about the nature of community action—and initiative—in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WAY OF SEEING by Rhoda Metraux
Released: March 10, 1970

"The collection closes in the field with a revisit to New Guinea, leaving many enlightened insights but no great impact."
These essays have a magazine column ring to them limited in depth but nicely balanced, thoughtful but not demanding, familiar but not intimate, with a general tone of challenge, uplift, and measured optimism—not surprising, since they have appeared as a regular feature in Redbook over the past eight years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"For those seeking to renew that earlier revelation, the new Family may well speak."
A deluxe volume combining the text of the famous anthropologist Margaret Mead and the photographer who worked with her in Bali and Mexico makes a bid for the market of The Family of Man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 9, 1959

"Belles, letters, autobiography, the history of a formative period in anthropology are encompassed here, and will be sought out by all students of civilized life."
Known to college students the world over for her Patterns of Culture. Read full book review >