Search Results: "Margie Gelbwasser"


BOOK REVIEW

PIECES OF US by Margie Gelbwasser
Released: March 8, 2012

"Suspenseful, disturbing and emotionally fraught, a strong novel for a strong stomach. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Two sets of deeply damaged siblings fall apart when their once-compartmentalized worlds of school and summer connect and crash. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INCONVENIENT by Margie Gelbwasser
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 10, 2010

"However, the other important thread, Alyssa's growing attraction to fellow runner Keith, is stronger and better integrated, though readers will guess its strongly telegraphed surprise. (Fiction. YA)"
Fifteen-year-old Alyssa, the daughter of Russian Jews who came to America when she was four, lives in suburban New Jersey, where on the surface everything is smooth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD AS GOLDIE by Margie Palatini
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2000

"She addresses a sensitive subject for young children, deftly using humor to lighten the mood with her signature flair for the comical and giving readers a protagonist with whom they can identify. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Palatini's (Ding Dong Ding Dong, 1999) hilarious tale offers readers a kid's-eye view of sibling relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDIE IS MAD by Margie Palatini
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Although highly idealized—if only all toddler tantrums ran such a smooth course—Goldie's tale of woe and redemption is perfect for young readers learning how to manage their own roiling emotions. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A time-out gives an irate tot a chance to ponder the finer aspects of sibling relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DING DONG DING DONG by Margie Palatini
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Fine's luxurious palette and angled perspectives add to the broad humor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
PLB 0-7868-2367-4 Outrageous puns, sly references, and wonderfully exaggerated pastels are just the ticket from the team behind Zoom Broom (1998). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"Readers who are untroubled by these flaws will surely admire Danielsen's strength and resourcefulness. (TV rights to CBS- TV)"
A true, and highly disturbing, recounting of a wife's worst nightmare—the ideal" husband revealed as fugitive murderer—that unfortunately provides a textbook example of how overheated, emotionally wrought writing will serve to obscure dramatic coherence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Scoop on Good Grammar by Margie Blumberg
Released: Nov. 17, 2013

"A thorough and useful adjunct to English textbooks and an effective reference tool."
An overview of the basics of English grammar, written at a level appropriate for both adults and children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OINK? by Margie Palatini
by Margie Palatini, illustrated by Henry Cole
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2006

"Palatini's pigs are a couple of cunning free-thinkers, and Cole paints them just right—nothing cute here, only a pair of big Tom Sawyers quite comfortable in their own skins. (Picture book. 4-8)"
To be a pig in pig heaven—there's a goal to set one's sights upon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUBY BAKES A CAKE by Susan Hill
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2004

"This story would also work well as a read-aloud in primary-grade classrooms as a counterpoint to 'The Little Red Hen' or in conjunction with other cumulative stories. (Easy reader. 5-7)"
Ruby is a chubby raccoon in a green dress with a very limited background in the kitchen in this appealing mid-level entry in the I Can Read series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOOSETACHE by Margie Palatini
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"A riot. (Picture book. 2-5)"
There's hair everywhere in this book because Moose just doesn't know how to control his gigantic mustache. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELF HELP by Margie Palatini
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"It's unfortunate for children's sharp eyes that the computer mouse is missing from three of the four scenes in which a computer is shown, even in the spread that refers to it, and hard on young techies that the Web address boasted in the subtitle fails to lead to an actual site. (Picture book. 4-7)"
From Palatini (The Wonder Worm Wars, p. 1310, etc.), a tongue-twisting tangle of cyberspeak that mars an otherwise merry tale of a mailroom elf who wants Santa's workshop to upgrade, download, and become high tech. Read full book review >