Search Results: "Mari Araki"


BOOK REVIEW

TINA'S MOUTH by Keshni Kashyap
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A charming, hip, illustrated coming-of-age tale."
Indian-American high-school student with a thing for Jean Paul Sartre struggles with existential angst in this graphic-novel debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMOKED by Mari Mancusi
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Where there's smoke, there's fire. And dragons. And the end of the world. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
No one is immune to sacrifice and revenge, and sometimes even a vegetarian dragon can have a taste for blood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESSES, INC.  by Mari Mancusi
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 18, 2017

"Lightweight, disposable fun. (Fiction. 9-12)"
News that YouTube star and fan-fiction hero Collin Prince will be a special guest at a comic convention sends Hailey, 13, and her three besties scrambling to finance a trip to Comicpalooza. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMONS OF LOVE by Mari Ruti
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"A psychological look at love relationships and their pragmatic benefits that cleverly blends scientific language and romantic concepts."
Canadian professor Ruti has love all figured out and explains why it's worth the trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERFECT TAIL by Mie Araki
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Overall, a perfect tale indeed. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Fresh from The Magic Toolbox (2003), Fred, a rabbit, and Lulu, a rhino, return in another engaging encounter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC TOOLBOX by Mie Araki
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"An engaging debut. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Araki suggests that anything is possible, given the right tools. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 27, 1996

"Correctness for the pre-law set."
A small order of leftist jurisprudence to go, by a self- described ``female Asian-American radical law professor who does theory.'' Matsuda (Law/Georgetown Univ.) collects 16 brief speeches delivered to legal and lay (mostly academic) audiences on her outsider status in the law, in academia, and in Clinton's America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"A truly comprehensive overview of this hot health topic: sound medical information, practical advice, and the sympathetic support of those in the same boat."
paper 0-89793-271-4 Researcher Skelly and reporter Helm both suffer from fibromyalgia, and both had difficulties securing an accurate diagnosis and effective medical treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUT GUIDE 101 by Mari J Hahn
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 17, 2014

"An informative guide to healthy eating choices that's more concerned with overall well-being than weight loss."
Debut writer Hahn offers a plan for improving health through better digestion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNSEEN by Mari Jungstedt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 5, 2006

"Jungstedt kicks off her series—the subsequent two are headed for English translation—with foreboding atmosphere, plausible police work, a pat ending, several loose ends and a particularly handsome use of those endless days in a Swedish June."
The island of Gotland during the longest days of the Scandinavian midsummer is the setting for Jungstedt's grim procedural debut, first published in Sweden in 2003. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LIVE IN TOKYO by Mari Takabayashi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A painted map of Japan provides a frame of reference, and the final page includes pronunciations for the months, the numbers from one to twelve, and a few Japanese words and phrases. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
Here is a charming—and accurate—introduction to Tokyo as seen through the eyes of a fictional seven-year-old girl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 1997

"But not everyone will buy into their communal vision of justice, which will remain anathema to unreconstructed rugged American individualists."
Responding to the current wave of affirmative-action backlash, two Georgetown law professors, each proud beneficiaries of the policy, stand as zealous advocates brooking no retreat. ``Our parents taught us that . . . the struggle to make a place at the table for ourselves was also the struggle to free the souls of those who would exclude us,'' write Lawrence (who is African-American) and Matsuda (Japanese-American) of their individual family legacies of political idealism and civil rights activism. Read full book review >