Search Results: "Maria Louise Ascher"


BOOK REVIEW

JOHNNY MAD DOG by Emmanuel Dongala
Released: May 5, 2005

"One respects this earnest tale's passion and indignation, but little else. Johnny is a posturing monster, Laokolé a stoical saint, and every action and thought of each is reduced to melodramatic cliché. The result is an all-too-credible horror story, but not a good novel."
The native Congolese author, now Massachusetts-based, writes of civil war and its attendant atrocities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WALK IN THE FOREST by Maria Dek
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"A startling, successful evocation of the natural world and an urgent entreaty for young people to immerse themselves in the outdoors. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A pale-skinned child crosses a blank, white page into a screen of trees, where "wonders await." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES COUNTING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A worthy addition to the ranks of animal-themed counting books. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Yates' lovable Dog—of Dog Loves Books (2010) and Dog Loves Drawing (2012)—is back for some counting fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL SURPRISE by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"Small children who feel they aren't big enough to do anything will appreciate the message, while their adults might be inspired to look for the hidden talents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Small children may not be able to walk far, wipe their noses or tie their own shoes, but they have their own special talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOBODY'S FAMILY IS GOING TO CHANGE by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"All in all, this is more like a muted manifesto than anything else, but Fitzhugh's approach to family dynamics is certainly child centered, and Emma's observant sketches of her parents' and her peers' behavior, along with her own abrasive contributions to the agitation, provide some flashes of life and recognition."
If Paula Fox as a white author was criticized for writing of black experience in The Slave Dancer, even though her hero was white, Fitzhugh makes herself even more vulnerable by telling a black family's story from the viewpoints of the two children—Emma (short for Emancipation), about eleven, and Willie, seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPORT by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 30, 1979

"And—where the characters in the first book were memorable, larger-than-life caricatures—Sport's mother here is merely a predictable and uninteresting stereotype; Kate is too perfect an answer to the Rocques' prayers; and Sport's three friends—one Jewish, one black, and one Hispanic—seem an unrealistic vestige of naive Sixties didacticism."
You'll remember Harriet the Spy's friend Sport Rocque as the eleven-year-old who keeps house and account books for his impractical writer father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF NOWHERE by Maria Padian
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"An encouraging, if incomplete, tale of high school sports in the melting pot. (Fiction. 13-16)"
When Somali refugees move to his Maine town, a soccer captain matures in this Chris Crutcher-reminiscent drama based on a true event. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALMOST FOREVER by Maria Testa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A tour de force. (Fiction/Poetry. 8-12)"
Each of these chapters is a poem, and together they take a six-year-old-girl on a journey from Christmas 1967 when her father first gets his orders for Vietnam, to February of 1969, when he comes home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS ONE IS MINE by Maria Semple
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 4, 2008

"Clearly smart and talented, Semple never satisfactorily accomplishes the difficult task of balancing nasty comedy and romantic uplift."
Former television comedy writer Semple offers a semi-satirical, funny-sad romance about a spoiled Hollywood wife, a former television writer, who considers risking all for a wholly inappropriate affair with a sleazy musician. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH IN AN IVORY TOWER by Maria Hudgins
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 18, 2014

"Although she provides no serious competition to Oxford masters Dorothy L. Sayers or Colin Dexter, Hudgins (Death of a Second Wife, 2012, etc.) provides piquant dashes of local color and enough red herrings to keep the reader guessing."
A visiting American finds the mystique of Oxford marred by murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH OF A SECOND WIFE by Maria Hudgins
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 15, 2012

"To the series' usual attractive locations seasoned with a dash of history, Hudgins adds a mystery with an intriguing group of suspects."
A wedding party gathers on a remote Swiss mountaintop, where the uninvited guest is murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALICE WALKER by Maria Lauret
Released: Jan. 17, 2000

"The best kind of literary criticism: Not blind to Walker's flaws as a writer and a thinker, Lauret still finds richness and depth in her writing that will send readers back to the novels."
An engrossing analysis of the novels and other works of Alice Walker that unearths intricate relationships and challenging premises. Read full book review >