Search Results: "Marie-Monique Robin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 4, 2010

"Unblinkingly partisan, which by no means dilutes its highly disconcerting message."
In a book that won the 2009 Rachel Carson Prize, French journalist and documentary filmmaker Robin rakes agribusiness behemoth Monsanto across the coals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEEP BLUE MEMORY by Monique Urza
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"A brocade of bright conceits that needs more air and space."
A meditative, richly imaged (perhaps a shade too richly) fictional memoir having to do with the secret darks and the secure, loving frame of family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RUMOR by Monique Felix
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 15, 2011

"Ironically enough, this particular Rumor doesn't seem likely to inspire much repetition. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A group of animal friends misinterprets a small piece of information, resulting in outsized fears and creating a one-joke tale that rolls quickly along to a happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEARNING THE ROPES by Monique Polak
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"A quick read with a fascinating focus. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Fifteen-year-old Mandy dreams of becoming a rope-climbing aerialist in the circus and flies off to Montreal to attend circus camp despite her father's fears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRACLEVILLE by Monique Polak
CLASSICS
Released: April 1, 2011

"There are better books about religious identity out there; try The Possibilities of Sainthood, by Donna Freitas (2008), for a start. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Sixteen-year-old Ani, devout, straitlaced and anxious, could not be more different from her impious, free-spirited, sexually active 15-year-old sister, Colette. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORENSICS SQUAD UNLEASHED by Monique Polak
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2016

"Science and courage make for an appealing mystery for dog lovers. (Mystery. 8-11)"
A 13-year-old budding criminal analyst gets to go to forensics day camp in the summer and also finds a real mystery to crack. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BITTER IN THE MOUTH by Monique Truong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 31, 2010

"Truong remains a stunning wordsmith and a whiz at intellectual showmanship, but Linda's story tastes of artificial plot manipulation."
After the dazzle of her debut (The Book of Salt, 2003), Truong returns with a coming-of-age narrative about a young girl who has always felt like an outsider in her small North Carolina town, not to mention within her own family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARCHIPELAGO by Monique Roffey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 2013

"A bit short on narrative energy, but appealingly warmhearted; readers will empathize with the endearing characters and want them to have a happy ending."
Unmoored by catastrophe, a father takes his daughter and dog to sea in this gentle novel from Orange Prize finalist Roffey (The White Woman on the Green Bicycle, 2011, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE DO I END AND YOU BEGIN? by Shulamith Oppenheim
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"An elegant conversation starter to a not-so-simple question. (Picture book. 5-8)"
From animals to plants, sky to sea, people to people, we're all connected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUSHOUT by Monique W. Morris
NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 2016

"A powerful and thought-provoking book of social science."
A writer and educator explores how various learning environments marginalize black girls and push them away from positive and productive futures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRAIGHT PUNCH by Monique Polak
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 1, 2014

"Though simple, the story provides both insight and entertainment. (Fiction. 12-17)"
A girl who can't stop "tagging"—spray painting her initials on buildings—is caught one too many times and sent to a struggling alternative school in a poor neighborhood in Montreal. Read full book review >