Search Results: "Marietta Whittlesey"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"Occasionally too graphic for comfort, but overall, entertaining and instructive."
A husband-and-wife team of dermatologists use fascinating clinical tales about their patients to share their knowledge of the body's outer wrapping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEACHES AND SCREAMS by G.A. McKevett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A whodunit as old-fashioned and satisfying as one of Granny Reid's bacon-egg-and-grits breakfasts."
Some burdens are unavoidable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VENETIAN MASK by Rosalind Laker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"But her characters are spunky and her plot satisfies, even if it doesn't describe the character behind La Serenissima's mask in anything other than the most simplistic terms."
More old-fashioned historical romance from Laker (The Golden Tulip, etc. etc.), this time set in Venice just before Napoleon forces the declining republic to its knees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 26, 1951

"An impressive, absorbing biography heralded as brilliant by the British press, which will receive strong support here."
A first authoritative biography of Florence Nightingale which is based on a tremendous amount of new material (from family papers to her own exhaustive "private notes") and which creates a powerful, impassioned portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 7, 1950

"Having sold 60,000 in England, this will have heavy advertising from the publisher, with postcards and display cards available to bookstores."
A thoroughly charming and polished brief for the cultivation of hobbies — particularly painting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO REGRETS by Caroline Seebohm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Too much emphasis on celebrity guest lists and the houses, dresses, and servants that money could buy override the very real courage that Tree and her generation demonstrated in demanding to lead their own lives. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The woman who emerges from this biography is a kind of classy Pamela Harriman—certainly not the image Marietta Peabody Tree, a minister's daughter and a Peabody of Massachusetts, envisioned for herself. Read full book review >