Search Results: "Mario Alberto Zambrano"


BOOK REVIEW

LOTERÍA by Mario Alberto  Zambrano
Released: July 9, 2013

"A contemplative yet discordant collection of stories about where life's scars originate."
A young Mexican-American girl recounts the heartbreaking dissolution of her entire family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPER MARIO by Jeff Ryan
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 4, 2011

"Late stumbles aside, an effective and entertaining overview of the video-game industry's history and Nintendo's essential role in shaping it."
A gaming journalist retraces Nintendo's unlikely shaping of video-game history through a pudgy Italian plumber named Mario. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIO & BABY GIA by Mario Lopez
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A good choice for children with younger siblings and cousins, especially Latinos. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Returning with his second picture book, Lopez (Mud Tacos, 2009) stresses the importance of family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIO MAKES A MOVE by Jill McElmurry
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2012

"A charming story of friendship, dance moves, artistic fervor and squirrels. (And squirrel facts!) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mario is a squirrel who loves his dance moves, from the "Bowling Ball" to "Twirly Ballet Arms," and his relatives assure him he is amazing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SILENCE OF MARIO SALVIATI by Etienne van Heerden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Ambitious but diffuse."
Van Heerden offers a lyrical but underpowered interpretation of his country's history as a young woman visits an isolated village that's trapped in the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A generous spirit and penchant for grand gestures make him all the more worth knowing—particularly for American audiences unaware that there is any question about who was the first to fly. (bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 8-10)"
So the Wright Brothers were the first to fly? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"An only marginally fictional work, which will be of most interest to scholars of Ortega and of Zambrano's more theoretical works."
An imposing scholarly Delirium And Destiny ($59.50; paper $19.95; Jan.; 256 pp.; 0-7914-4019-2; paper 0-7914-4020-6): An imposing scholarly edition of an autobiographical novel written in the early 1950s but not published until 1989, at the death of its author (b. 1904), a well-known philosopher and disciple of Spanish master Ortega y Gasset. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Perhaps too dense for casual readers, but lotus to lovers of Homer."
Brief but rich history of a mysterious bard and two wondrous works that serve as foundation stones for Western culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"A fine book about books that will appeal to readers of Manguel's previous work."
Graceful essays on books, reading, and the subversive possibilities of ideas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL MEN ARE LIARS by Alberto Manguel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2012

"This novel succeeds both as a story and an illumination of storytelling."
A beguiling exercise in metafiction, one that tells an engrossing story from various perspectives while undermining the possibility of truth in storytelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVENSON UNDER THE PALM TREES by Alberto Manguel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A small but rich little instant classic, as though Joseph Conrad had sent up a perfect new tale from the silence beyond the grave."
Manguel (News from a Foreign Country Came, 1990; the nonfiction A History of Reading, 1995; etc.) offers a tiny but deft and quietly moving story of Robert Louis Stevenson at his premature death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GODFATHER by Mario Puzo
Released: March 10, 1969

"A Mafia Whiteoaks, bound for popularity, once you get past the author's barely concealed admiration for the 'ethics' and postulates of primitive power plays."
Ten years in the workaday progress of a New York Mafia sort of family dynasty tale with all the attendant flurries of great houses at war. Read full book review >