Search Results: "Marissa Meyer"


BOOK REVIEW

FAIREST by Marissa Meyer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"Fans should just wait for Winter, coming in fall 2015. (Science fiction/fairy tale. 13 & up)"
Meyer takes a short break between books in the Lunar Chronicles to explore the back story of evil Queen Levana. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCARLET by Marissa Meyer
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Readers who can ignore the flaws will find the book goes down easy, and they will be happy to wait in line for the third installment. (Science fiction/fairy tale. 12 & up)"
Meyer returns with the second installment of the Lunar Chronicles for a futuristic spin on "Little Red Riding Hood." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDER by Marissa Meyer
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"Despite the simplistic and incongruous-feeling telepathic-enslaver theme, readers will return for the next installment in this sharp, futuristic 'Cinderella' tale. (Science fiction/fairy tale. 12-15)"
Although it packs in more genres than comfortably fit, this series opener and debut offers a high coolness factor by rewriting Cinderella as a kickass mechanic in a plague-ridden future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOMBS OVER LONDON by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Lively writing and a smattering of line drawings make for an enjoyable adventure that will entice readers to go along with Mira. (author's note, bibliography) (Fantasy. 10-14)"
In the latest installment in the Mira's Diary time-travel series, Mira pursues her missing mother, Serena, to 1917 London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMELIA'S MIDDLE-SCHOOL GRADUATION YEARBOOK by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 20, 2015

"A hint at the end leaves room for this series to evolve into high school; Amelia may be a bit long in the tooth, but devoted fans will follow. (Graphic fiction. 8-12)"
In this newest, 20th-anniversary offering of the Amelia's Notebook series, Amelia graduates middle school and reminisces about all she has learned along the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOST IN PARIS by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"A surprise ending will leave readers anticipating Mira's next mission as she follows her mother through time and history. (bibliography) (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Her mother's mysterious absence, a perplexing postcard and a unique family ability sends Mira on a race through time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX DISASTER #1 by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

In these retooled versions of Max's Logbook (2003) and Max's Mystical Logbook (2004), Moss discards the graph-paper backgrounds, expands the role of a small green pencil-topper that is (at least in the young narrator's mind) a visitor from space with telepathic powers and remixes lightly revised text and art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALEN by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"For readers not yet up to Carol Lawrence's Roman Mystery series, this makes an equally agreeable combination of story and history. (glossary) (Fiction. 8-10)"
The author of the "Young American Voices" series takes readers considerably further into the past for a slave's-eye view of life in Emperor Augustus's household. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMELIA'S NOTEBOOK by Marissa Moss
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 6, 1995

"This is a carefully coordinated story that only seems like haphazard scribbling. (Picture book. 7+)"
Amelia is a bit smug and precocious, but then so are some of our favorite nine-year-olds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNICK KNACK PADDYWACK by Marissa Moss
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1992

"A unique counting book; entertaining sf for the youngest; and just nifty good fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This old man is not what you expect, though his antics in Moss's creative adaptation are as ebullient as in the traditional version. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMELIA WRITES AGAIN by Marissa Moss
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 12, 1996

"Though that particular section reflects some childlike wisdom, much of the notebook is corny. (Picture book. 7+)"
Amelia is back, as precocious as ever. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

AVIATRIXES
by Leila Roy

Her birthday, the day she died, the day she first realized she wanted to fly—if we tried, I’m sure that we could make any day into Bessie Coleman day. But today is an especially good pick, because ninety-six years ago, on June 15, 1921, Bessie Coleman earned her pilot’s license—the first African American woman, as well as the first woman ...


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