Search Results: "Marjorie Holmes"


BOOK REVIEW

SECOND WIFE, SECOND LIFE! by Marjorie Holmes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 20, 1993

"A treat for Holmes fans and, for those less taken with the inspirational subtext, a realistic yet upbeat account of love and marriage in the sunset years."
From the popular octogenarian columnist and inspirational author (The Messiah, 1987, etc.): a moving and refreshingly candid account of her second marriage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR by Herman Wouk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1955

"Primarily a woman's book, although it may open the doors to some men's understanding and sympathy."
As different from The Caine Mutiny as that was from Aurora Dawn- this should tap a wholly different vein. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"The evolution of a literary partnership at its best, with Rawlings revealing the anguish, frustration, and fulfillment of a dedicated writer's life and Perkins the empathy and unwavering standards of a remarkable editor. (Facsimiles, 6 b&w photos, most not seen.)"
The editor a writer dreams of and the writer an editor yearns for come to life in this exchange of letters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAG-MARJORIE and WON OVER by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Though the tales are dated and at a glance have little import for the modern reader, Gilman's sharp characters and her insights into gender traps provide enough appeal to interest those outside academic circles."
Two didactic, at times sentimental novels (first serialized in Gilman's magazine, The Forerunner) still prove fascinating in their explications of gender in turn-of-the-century New England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYCROFT HOLMES by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"The central conceit is audacious; Mycroft's sense of moral outrage is nicely reflective of the era; the historical detail is solid; and the period decorum is well-maintained throughout. Only the characters and their cumbersome individual interactions are muffled by all the grade-A trappings."
That's right: nonpareil basketball player Abdul-Jabbar, who's already written memoirs, nonfiction titles, and children's books (Stealing the Game, 2015, etc.), partners with screenwriter Waterhouse to introduce a prequel to the adventures of Sherlock Holmes' smarter brother.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEAMPUNK HOLMES by P. C. Martin
by P. C. Martin, illustrated by Daniel Cortes, developed by Noble Beast
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Sept. 23, 2013

"Suspend disbelief, then, and try not to get too caught up in the gears of Watson's prosthetic superlimb. Say what? (Requires iOS 6 and above.)"
Mycroft Holmes as a superspy babe? Manta ray-like attack submarines in the Thames? This lively app makes such things seem just about right, even if they might give Conan Doyle pause. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

H.H. HOLMES by Adam Selzer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2017

"A passion for Holmes lore will lead to appreciation for the depth of background and lesser criminal exploits described in great detail, but the audience will remain limited."
An attempt to unmask an infamous mass murderer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WARLOCK HOLMES by G.S. Denning
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2016

"A reimagining of Sherlock Holmes that is often very silly but consistently funny, clever, and entertaining."
In a debut novel that cheerfully pokes fun at the Holmes-ian canon, Denning introduces readers to Warlock Holmes, a supernaturally gifted counterpart to the famous consulting detective of 221B Baker St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1995

"Much of the trail in this collection leads to quotidian lawyer work, but there are also paths that reveal a man of great wisdom, and cul de sacs that betray a man of great folly."
Holmes (18411935) wrote some of the Supreme Court decisions most venerated by liberals, particularly those defending free speech, but he was also very much a man of the 19th century. Read full book review >