Search Results: "Mark Frost"


BOOK REVIEW

FROST by Wendy Delsol
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Well-paced narration will keep readers interested—a superior paranormal adventure. (Paranormal adventure. 12 & up)"
This second installment in the planned Stork trilogy sends Kat and Jack into the hidden realms of Norse mythology and novel that also retells Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROST by Marianna Baer
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"For those fans of Gail Giles and Nancy Werlin who don't mind thrillers with a slower pace. (Thriller. 13 & up)"
Boarding school turns from magical to deadly in this debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROST by M.P.  Kozlowsky
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A wild, robot-driven ride with nods to a far darker kind of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. (Science fiction. 13-17)"
In a post-apocalyptic world, a girl who's never left home sets out on an arduous quest to save her sick pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROST by Thomas Bernhard
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 19, 2006

"Great stuff, but it won't make you feel good."
The late, brilliant Austrian writer's first (1963) novel, previously untranslated, is a characteristic excoriation of all things great and small and the tragicomedy of existence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LETTERS OF ROBERT FROST, VOLUME 1 by Robert Frost
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2014

"Judiciously annotated with a biographical glossary of correspondents and an indispensable chronology, this volume may well inspire a Frost renaissance."
Letters illuminate the life of an iconic American poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECOND OBJECTIVE by Mark Frost
Released: May 15, 2007

"It doesn't spoil the suspense of this historical fiction to know which side wins."
Germany makes a last-gasp attempt to defeat the Allies and change the course of history, in the latest from Frost (The Six Messiahs, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIST OF 7 by Mark Frost
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 1993

"821, it far outclasses)—but a jolly good adventure yarn for that. (Film rights to Universal)"
History has it that Arthur Conan Doyle based Sherlock Holmes on his med-school teacher Dr. Joseph Bell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PALADIN PROPHECY by Mark Frost
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 25, 2012

"Superficial adventure with arbitrary authorial intrusions at every plot twist. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
New school and new mental powers meet ancient mysteries and ancient war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 6, 2007

"An intriguing tale, capably written, but lacking a greater sense of significance, either to golf or to professional sports in general."
The latest from novelist and golf writer Frost (The Grand Slam: Bobby Jones, America, and the Story of Golf, 2004, etc.) examines a historic match, when legendary professionals Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson squared off against top amateurs Harvie Ward and Ken Venturi. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 6, 2002

"Captivating entertainment. (26 b&w photos, throughout)"
An award-winning TV writer (Hill Street Blues) turned novelist Frost (The Six Messiahs, 1995, etc.) proves just as skilled at nonfiction in his affectionate recreation of the dramatic 1913 US Open Golf Championship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Fans won't argue the game's significance to the sport, but Frost's narrative is over-the-top and gushing, making it strictly for baseball die-hards."
A pitch-by-pitch account of the game best known for the image of the hopping, waving, ecstatic catcher Carlton Fisk, whose 12th-inning home run won the game for the Boston Red Sox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIX MESSIAHS by Mark Frost
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1995

"Haute folderol from a master of the game."
Another vastly entertaining outing for Arthur Conan Doyle, whom Frost (The List of 7, 1993) seems bent on starring in lurid adventures to rival those of the Scottish physician's own storied hero, Sherlock Holmes. Read full book review >