Search Results: "Mark Fuhrman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Mostly forsaking sensationalism for plodding detail, Fuhrman disappoints: this is only for people interested in the tedious nitty-gritty of apprehending a killer."
The grisly account of a Spokane, Washington, serial killer's spree, and a critique of the local police department's investigation of the crimes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 2, 2003

"Fuhrman's prose may plod, but it nonetheless convinces that a criminal justice system can be criminal and lack justice."
The notorious detective from the OJ trial examines some capital cases in Oklahoma and concludes that the death penalty should be abolished. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SIMPLE ACT OF MURDER by Mark Fuhrman
NON-FICTION
Released: April 11, 2006

"So Oswald did it alone after all. Hmmm. Watch for talk-show debates over this one—maybe involving Oliver Stone, whose 1991 film JFK provides the antithesis of Fuhrman's book."
If only Dealey Plaza could talk: a fresh, counterintuitive take on the JFK assassination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys shows that Fuhrman had much promise, and it is unfortunate that we will never have the joy of seeing his talents bloom."
A light tale of rebellious eighth graders set in a Savannah Catholic junior high school in 1974, written by a young Georgian who died of cancer as he was completing this, his only novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Downeaster by Paul Thomas Fuhrman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 18, 2016

"A clever, riveting, and multifaceted tale about sailing, so vivid that readers should taste the salt spray."
A debut historical novel captures life on the ocean waves in the late 19th century. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARK SUNDEEN
by Megan Labrise

Writing about the simple life proved anything but for immersive journalist Mark Sundeen.

His original manuscript—an unadorned account of three couples who, in varying ways, have opted out of everyday American consumerism—was accepted and revised when he withdrew it from publisher Riverhead Books.

“I had a close friend read it, call me, and say, I stopped reading at page 175 ...


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BLOG POST

MARK HELPRIN
by Rhett Morgan

In both his travels and his writing, novelist Mark Helprin purposefully avoids the well-known icons and emblems associated with Paris, opting instead for everyday suburban streets and lesser-known architectural gems like the Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière. “That’s one of the reasons that Paris is so beautiful,” the author of Paris in the Present Tense points out. “They’ve taken such great ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DILLY DALLY DAISY by Mark Fearing
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 28, 2015

"An ode to young daydreamers—and tempting distractions—everywhere. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Daisy Marsha Martin has perfected the art of dawdling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTHLING! by Mark Fearing
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2012

"A fun, intergalactic buddy story that may not reinvent the wheel—or the UFO—but works well here, nonetheless. (Graphic science fiction. 9-12)"
After catching the wrong bus, young Bud finds himself at a school that's out of this world—literally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"It should find a place in every collection. (Nonfiction. 6+)"
A clean, clear, lighthearted look at the communicative clout of color, contrast and contour. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FUNNY FARM by Mark  Teague
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

"Ultimately, there's very little story holding the book together, but the humor found on each page is satisfying in its own right. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In this picture-book twist on Green Acres, the joke is on citified cousin Edward, a dapper dog who visits his Uncle Earl's farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUILT BY ANGELS by Mark Podwal
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

"A beautiful, Impressionistic introduction to a portion of Judaic lore and a European architectural marvel. (historical note) (Picture book. 7-10)"
Legend, history and spiritual significance intertwine in Podwal's illustrated free-verse poem paying homage to Prague's Altneuschul, or Old-New Synagogue, which is the oldest in Europe, dating back to 1270, and is treasured for its early Gothic architecture. Read full book review >