Search Results: "Mark Harris"


BOOK REVIEW

DIAMOND by Mark Harris
NON-FICTION
Released: June 20, 1994

"Harris has an engaging voice, although he does trot out a lot of old saws—how baseball nurtured American democracy, nostalgia for day games on grass—that just don't cut it any more."
The author of the novel Bang the Drum Slowly gathers over 40 years' worth of baseball essays and throws in an excerpt from Bang, as well as the entire screenplay of the movie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SELF-MADE BRAIN SURGEON by Mark Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 13, 1999

THE SELF-MADE BRAIN SURGEONand Other StoriesHarris, Mark Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Millennial Reincarnations by Daniel Mark Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2015

"While ambitious and high-flying, this millennial tale remains bedazzled by the elite."
A novel follows the fortunes of young people in Shanghai and New York City who seek status, wealth, and sex against the backdrop of dynastic reincarnation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2014

"As riveting and revealing as a film by an Oscar winner."
Entertainment Weekly writer Harris (Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood, 2008) returns with a comprehensive, cleareyed look at the careers of five legendary directors who put their Hollywood lives on freeze-frame while they went off to fight in the only ways they knew how. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TALE MAKER by Mark Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 20, 1994

"Sic semper Mark Harris."
A plot that carries no spare parts and a ``gentle reader'' style of address combine with Dickensian characters to give the feel of a classic to Harris's (Bang the Drum Slowly, 1956, etc.) small tale of a short story writer's struggle with an adversarial critic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 18, 2008

"As entertaining and sweeping as an engrossing Hollywood epic, and a promising source for a great documentary."
A wide-angle take on a major watershed period in American filmmaking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"While a valuable contribution to the history of epidemiology, the book contains more than average readers may want to know about sanitary laws over the centuries and the accompanying diplomatic and medical quarrels."
AIDS probably began in Africa and the influenza of 1918 in Europe. Modern transportation spread them across the world, but pre-modern transportation did the same with surprising efficiency, according to this detailed, scholarly examination of the politics of pandemics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 11, 2013

"A no-holds-barred indictment of the system, filled with memorable anecdotes and accessibly written."
Two high-profile defense lawyers pull back the curtain on the U.S. criminal justice system and find much to criticize. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARK SUNDEEN
by Megan Labrise

Writing about the simple life proved anything but for immersive journalist Mark Sundeen.

His original manuscript—an unadorned account of three couples who, in varying ways, have opted out of everyday American consumerism—was accepted and revised when he withdrew it from publisher Riverhead Books.

“I had a close friend read it, call me, and say, I stopped reading at page 175 ...


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BLOG POST

JESSICA B. HARRIS
by Maya Payne Smart

Scenic and engaging, My Soul Looks Back recounts the years author Jessica B. Harris spent on the periphery of a circle of friends that included literary powerhouses James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, and Toni Morrison. The memoir spans the globe and several decades to describe the fascinating group.

Harris was in a relationship with Baldwin’s close friend Samuel Clemens Floyd III ...


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BOOK REVIEW

HOT, COLD, SHY, BOLD by Pamela Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"One picture that spans an entire spread—of two girls facing each other—is spoiled because the book's binding falls at a crucial area of the photograph; it shows that their 'how-do-you-do' faces are aimed not at each other, but at the buggy occupant of a jar. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A concept book in photographs that holds nothing new for those familiar with Tana Hoban's or Margaret Miller's work. Read full book review >