Search Results: "Mark Henshaw"


BOOK REVIEW

COLD SHOT by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2014

"Tense, suspenseful and loaded with immersive detail."
The Iranians are doing something shady in Venezuela, and it's up to the CIA's Burke and Stryker to put a stop to it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED CELL by Mark Henshaw
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2012

"In this deft novel of intelligence, the CIA actually shines."
The Chinese are gearing up for a takeover of Taiwan, offering a scary vision of the future with the monstrous destruction of a Taiwanese naval base. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FALL OF MOSCOW STATION by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Henshaw's narrative is a high-tension page-turner, and his tough-minded, independent, and deadly Kyra Stryker is ready to run with the likes of Reacher or Bourne."
After a vital clandestine U.S. spy network is gutted by a defector, CIA Red Cell agent Kyra Stryker is forced to make a daring last-ditch attempt to avert disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF THE LINE OF FIRE by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A remarkable and brainy work of metafiction."
An Australian writer heads to Germany, where he gets strong doses of philosophy, violence, taboo sex, and unreliable narration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SNOW KIMONO by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 9, 2015

"Henshaw's prose shimmers as his narrative becomes ever more nuanced, complex, and misleading."
Henshaw creates a world of psychological complexity and emotional subtlety in a story that moves from Paris to Japan and back again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAR MR. HENSHAW by Beverly Cleary
Released: Aug. 22, 1983

"From the writing tips to the divorced-kid blues, however, it tends to substitute prevailing wisdom for the little jolts of recognition that made the Ramona books so rewarding."
Possibly inspired by the letters Cleary has received as a children's author, this begins with second-grader Leigh Botts' misspelled fan letter to Mr. Henshaw, whose fictitious book itself derives from the old take-off title Forty Ways W. Amuse a Dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISSING MARK by Julie Kramer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 14, 2009

"Nicely done, if not groundbreaking, with a likable heroine in an intriguing profession."
TV investigative reporter Riley Spartz has an instinct about stories, and the unexplained disappearance of a groom-to-be gets her juices flowing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 20, 2001

"A coffee-table volume that someone might actually read—and enjoy. The wonders of Burns and Company never cease. (110 b&w and 40 color illustrations)"
What comes after baseball, the Civil War, and jazz? Mark Twain, of course. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXCLAMATION MARK by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Funny and spirited (and secretly educational, but nobody will notice). (Picture book. 4-8)"
Punctuation with pizzazz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 19, 2012

"This smart, stylish series opener raises the bar for paranormal fiction, leaving readers impatient for the next installment. (author's note) (Urban fantasy. 12 & up)"
Crime noir meets paranormal romance in this addictive thriller about two London teens in whom the fae awakens, conferring abilities at once exhilarating and harshly stigmatized. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPA’S MARK by Gwendolyn Battle-Lavert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 15, 2004

"Heartfelt. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Talk of the upcoming election permeates the African-American community because, for the first time, they will be permitted to vote alongside their white neighbors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Providing an expansive view of Rothko and his milieu, and rich in information about the New York art scene—but a breathless enthusiasm for his subject leads Breslin to descriptive excess, especially with regard to individual paintings. (Color & b&w illustrations)"
The full-bodied fruit of seven years' labor—a zealous, uncommonly kind portrait of one of Abstract Expressionism's irascible masters—from Breslin (William Carlos Williams, 1970). Read full book review >