Search Results: "Mark Henshaw"


BOOK REVIEW

THE FALL OF MOSCOW STATION by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Henshaw's narrative is a high-tension page-turner, and his tough-minded, independent, and deadly Kyra Stryker is ready to run with the likes of Reacher or Bourne."
After a vital clandestine U.S. spy network is gutted by a defector, CIA Red Cell agent Kyra Stryker is forced to make a daring last-ditch attempt to avert disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED CELL by Mark Henshaw
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2012

"In this deft novel of intelligence, the CIA actually shines."
The Chinese are gearing up for a takeover of Taiwan, offering a scary vision of the future with the monstrous destruction of a Taiwanese naval base. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLD SHOT by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2014

"Tense, suspenseful and loaded with immersive detail."
The Iranians are doing something shady in Venezuela, and it's up to the CIA's Burke and Stryker to put a stop to it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF THE LINE OF FIRE by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A remarkable and brainy work of metafiction."
An Australian writer heads to Germany, where he gets strong doses of philosophy, violence, taboo sex, and unreliable narration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SNOW KIMONO by Mark Henshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 9, 2015

"Henshaw's prose shimmers as his narrative becomes ever more nuanced, complex, and misleading."
Henshaw creates a world of psychological complexity and emotional subtlety in a story that moves from Paris to Japan and back again. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARK SUNDEEN
by Megan Labrise

Writing about the simple life proved anything but for immersive journalist Mark Sundeen.

His original manuscript—an unadorned account of three couples who, in varying ways, have opted out of everyday American consumerism—was accepted and revised when he withdrew it from publisher Riverhead Books.

“I had a close friend read it, call me, and say, I stopped reading at page 175 ...


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BLOG POST

MARK HELPRIN
by Rhett Morgan

In both his travels and his writing, novelist Mark Helprin purposefully avoids the well-known icons and emblems associated with Paris, opting instead for everyday suburban streets and lesser-known architectural gems like the Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière. “That’s one of the reasons that Paris is so beautiful,” the author of Paris in the Present Tense points out. “They’ve taken such great ...


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BOOK REVIEW

LaRUE FOR MAYOR by Mark  Teague
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

"Though less an election-year primer than a tale for dog lovers of every breed, this merits a spot alongside Doreen Cronin's wickedly satiric Duck For President, illustrated by Betsy Lewin (2004) as a waggish take on the theme. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Giving fans even more reason to "Like Ike"—the dog, that is—Teague pits his irrepressible, letter-writing canine against "Law and Order" candidate Hugo Bugwort in a race for Mayor of Snort City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOVING HOUSE by Mark Siegel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"A stronger message and more coherent magic would have made this charming story even more appealing. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This contemporary eco-fable suffers from a lack of internal logic, but the positive message and attractive retro artwork may still find favor with progressive parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 13, 2010

"Bright, glossy and flawed; excellent idea, less-than-excellent execution. (Informational picture book. 6-10)"
This shiny, cheerful lesson has mixed success conveying concepts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBOT DOG by Mark Oliver
by Mark Oliver, illustrated by Mark Oliver
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Like Chris Raschka's Arlene Sardine (1998), the meaning here definitely depends on the reader. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Twee tale of damaged mechanical doggies finding their bliss—or satirical religious allegory? Read full book review >