Search Results: "Mark J. Plotkin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2000

"A diverting journey, and an environmental alert."
A general look around at some of the strange and mysterious natural substances that ancient cultures have used for healing, coupled with a plea for their preservation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"No one could convey the potential tragedy of this statement more convincingly than this author, who has done something to remedy it."
In a captivating plea for more effective management of the rain forest's botanical, medicinal, and cultural resources, the chief ethnobotanist at Conservation International vividly recalls his apprenticeships to the tribal shamanic healers of the northeast Amazon. ``There exists no shortage of `wonder drugs' waiting to be found in the rain forests,'' says Plotkin, yet ``we know little or nothing about the chemical composition of 98.6% of the Brazilian flora''—and this despite the fact that, even now, the value of medicines derived from tropical plants is more than $6 billion a year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 3, 2002

"The present threat of biological terrorism makes this scientific page-turner especially timely."
Truly alarming report on the growing resistance of bacteria to once-effective antibiotics and the struggle of scientists to find new weapons against them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUNGLES by Mark J. Rauzon
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Excessively enlarged, overdramatic color photos and a rather lurid text will attract readers to this oversize book, but the whole is unsatisfying even as an introduction to jungle layers, wildlife, people, and the implications of deforestation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIN, SCALES, FEATHERS, AND FUR by Mark J. Rauzon
ANIMALS
Released: March 18, 1993

"Useful beginning science. (Nonfiction. 5-10)"
By a wildlife biologist, an attractive simple introduction to the different outer coverings of a broad selection of animals and their various functions and adaptations: camouflage, protection, a warning to predators, attraction for mates, etc. About three-fourths of the space here is given to excellent color photos (not credited; are they by the author?) of different species, sometimes in close-up or with magnified detail, simply captioned with the animal's species. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CORPORATE POWER IN AMERICA by Mark J. Green
Released: Jan. 1, 1972

"Nader above), this lacks the intensity of recent similar works like Heilbroner's In the Name of Corporate Profit (p. 235) and the proposed remedies are either stale or too soulful for the soulless."
Many years ago H. G. Wells wrote "It is not creative minds that produce revolutions, but the obstinate conservation of established authority," a sentiment that can serve as the text for this proficient if rather stereotyped critique of contemporary American corporate power. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 5, 2007

"A think piece about personal choices that unearths more round holes for square pegs."
One of America's most influential pollsters carves the present into bite-sized pieces in an attempt to reveal future trends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Elliza and Melkio by Mark J. Jannetta
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2016

"A classical, if uneven, fantasy story in which characters embrace their best selves, virtue triumphs, and selfless love overcomes all barriers."
A prince and princess learn the value of love and compassion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF JOBY by Mark J. Ferrari
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"Just quirky, clever, sincere and sporadically uplifting enough to balance the depressing nature of Joby's many trials."
Ferrari's allegorical fantasy debut updates the Book of Job, setting it in contemporary California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Index. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Discovered in 1979 by two hikers in New Mexico, Seismosaurus was even bigger than Ultrasaurus or Supersaurus—a giant sauropod estimated to have been 150 feet long and to have weighed ten EEUs (Equivalent Elephant Units), approximately 50 tons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE by Mark J. Rauzon
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"Brief but more comprehensive than the many books focusing on the water cycle; handsome color photos add to the immediacy of this useful summary. (Nonfiction. 6-9)"
An attractive overview of the water cycle and the importance of water to life on earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURSE OF CAIN by J. Mark Powell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2005

"An intriguing premise, inexpertly handled."
Oliver Stone, meet Stonewall Jackson: a by-the-numbers historical thriller turning on a plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. Read full book review >