Search Results: "Mark Jacobson"


BOOK REVIEW

EVERYONE AND NO ONE by Mark Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Jacobson's one-note humor wears thin very quickly, and his ad- hoc metaphysics simply annoy."
Journalist and novelist Jacobson (Gorijo, 1991) again ventures into Tom Robbins's territory for a seriocomic fiction that purports to be a profound commentary on America's obsession with appearance, tricked up with all sorts of anthro-religious jive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2003

"Best left on the shelf."
A Brooklyn-based journalist and novelist (Everyone and No One, 1997, etc.) takes his family on an exceptionally tedious global adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2005

"Personal, savvy journalism that will make readers stop in their tracks and ponder. Provocation, in a word, and Jacobson will trade you slap for slap."
Jazzy, under-the-skin forays into all manner of New York City life, from journalist Jacobson (12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"A well-executed, original reflection on how social evil tends to endure, puzzle and resist efforts at redemption."
A provocative exploration of one of the "Nazi ‘human skin atrocities' "—a lampshade supposedly made of human skin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOD-FEARER by Dan Jacobson
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A delicate, masterful fable in which the shadows of memory, the ravages of old age, and the mirrored horrors of history intertwine."
The tables of religious history are turned in this haunting tale about an old man's last days, in which he has to relive a craven episode of his youth that he had completely repressed—the latest from London-based writer Jacobson (the nonfiction Time and Again, 1985; plus several novels). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2008

"A juicy read for anyone interested in the intriguingly lascivious underworld of a purportedly straight-laced culture."
The exotic, delicately erotic world of Japanese nightclubs, as seen by an American employee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KALOOKI NIGHTS by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2007

"Jacobson's account of a life of 'jokes, Jews, bitterness, and whys' is clever, celebratory, condemnatory, excessive, overwhelming and unique."
A scorching disquisition on (British) Jewish identity, spun from an unspeakable criminal act. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO'S SORRY NOW? by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 2013

"Jacobson is often likened to Philip Roth, but there's plenty of Isaac Bashevis Singer in his somewhat weary understanding of the human condition. Fans won't be disappointed."
Another middle-age-angst-meets-sex-romp comedy from Jacobson (Man Booker Prize winner The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.), that great chronicler of modern rakery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZOO TIME by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Guy's not a lucky guy, to be sure, but if there's justice, Jacobson will enjoy best-sellerdom in his place with this latest romp."
Bad-boy funnyman Jacobson waxes pensive and topical—but no less mirthful—in his latest assault on the foibles of modern life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUNTED by Alan Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 13, 2001

"Jacobson rounds up the usual stick figures for yet another soapy suspenser."
In this wearisome thriller by the author of False Accusations (1999), the pivotal plot device is (brace yourself) amnesia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ACT OF LOVE by Howard Jacobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2009

"A robust novel—preposterous, disturbing and dazzlingly written."
A novel of sexual obsession and a little bit of guilt (but not much), from the London-based author of Kalooki Nights (2007), long-listed for the Man Booker Prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"This poignant and provocative book goes beyond its historical setting to get to the heart of why people do or don't identify with ethnic, national, or religious groups."
A dramatic exploration of varying degrees of Jewish identity espoused, concealed, or denied by 15 Holocaust survivors during and after the war. Read full book review >