Search Results: "Mark Meyers"


BOOK REVIEW

VICTRICIA MALICIA by Carrie Clickard
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Though swelly seas occasionally threaten, overall, it's smooth-enough sailing here. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Ahoy, mateys; there's one determined young girl aboard this pirate ship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FENWAY FOUL-UP by David A.  Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 22, 2011

"22, 2011. (historical notes) (Mystery. 6-9)"
A new series for emerging chapter-book readers combines the allure of baseball parks with the challenge of solving a mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOORS TO MADAME MARIE by Odette Meyers
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"Meyers's failure to confront her ambivalence about religion directly makes her story feel incomplete."
The episodic and deeply conflicted memories of a Jewish woman's childhood in France during WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER ME NOW by Annette Meyers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2001

"For the rest, Olivia is adorable, the '20s do roar with authenticity, and the plot bumbles in and out of potholes with Meyers's usual disregard for subtlety."
Madcap Greenwich Village poet Olivia Brown (Free Love, 1999), omnipresent cigarette in one hand and bottle of bootleg gin in the other, joins Vanity Fair editor Edmund (Bunny) Wilson and his date Daisy, aspiring novelist Dave Wolfe, gorgeous Paulo Ewing, and her tenant, superbrain private detective Harry Melville, for a house party at the Croton digs of Fordy and Kate Vaude, only to have their fun disrupted when the Vaude nanny, Adelle, is found hanging from a tree branch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUTCHMAN by Maan Meyers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1992

"A series on the leading couple's descendants is in the works."
New Amsterdam, 1664. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER by Annette Meyers
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Better-than-usual for the series."
Former Broadway dancer Leslie Wetzon, now a Wall Street executive headhunter, accompanies her best friend Carlos, a campy, gay choreographer, to a rehearsal of his new show—and discovers the dead body of Dilla, the much-disliked production assistant, draped over the balcony. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN HUSTON by Jeffrey Meyers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"The author is perhaps a bit overly enamored with his magnificent monster of a subject (and indulges a weakness for strained puns and clumsy humor), but this biography is a serious, intelligent, highly readable reckoning with Huston's outsize legacy."
A richly flavorful biography of John Huston, great director and bona fide man's man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUTCHMAN'S DILEMMA by Maan Meyers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The account of Racqel's banishment from, and reentry into, the Jewish community is intriguing; the rest is a confusing bore."
The fourth in this series about the Dutch-Jewish Pieter Tonneman family (The High Constable, 1994, etc.) returns to the New York of 1675, where Tonneman lives and prospers with second wife Racqel and their several children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Vivid and haunting: a great success."
Fast upon the heels of Kenneth Silverman and his splendid Edgar A. Poe (1991), Meyers (Joseph Conrad, 1991, etc.) fashions an even greater success with the same material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WITNESS OF COMBINES by Kent Meyers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Deeply felt, strikingly perceptive, and stunningly written, The Witness of Combines resonates with the wisdom and insight of a work no less than a lifetime in the making."
Two dozen beautifully crafted essays about the author's formative years on a southern Minnesota farm explore with deft grace "what it meant to love a place and lose it." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOGART by Jeffrey Meyers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 1997

"A refreshingly serious film biography that movie lovers will appreciate for approaching Bogart as a subject, not a celebrity. (49 b&w photos, not seen)"
The man now considered America's greatest movie star is chronicled seriously and fully, but not always movingly or with new critical insight. Read full book review >