Search Results: "Mark Rotella"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2003

"Better than gelato. Not to be missed."
Evocative, beautifully rendered travelogue/memoir by Publishers Weekly editor Rotella, recounting his adventures in Calabria, the toe of Italy's boot and the land of his ancestry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMORE by Mark Rotella
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 21, 2010

"A fine general overview of one of the richest veins in American popular music."
Publishers Weekly review editor Rotella (Stolen Figs and Other Adventures in Calabria, 2003) presents an affectionate survey of the Italian songs and singers that have distinguished American popular music, with a particular focus on the period bracketed by World War II and the rock 'n' roll revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"But he makes it clear that Mexico's transition to greater electoral democracy will be threatened if more heroes don't step forward."
Rotella, the Los Angeles Times bureau chief for South America, tells his alarming story of drug lords' domination of the US/Mexico border region by focusing on the frustrations and martyrdom of Mexican reformers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CUT TIME by Carlo Rotella
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2003

"Rotella gives back to boxing some of its old-school, venerable aura."
Natty, cogitative essays on the sweet science, often from the perspective of the small boxing venue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW CHAMPIONS THINK by Bob Rotella
NON-FICTION
Released: May 5, 2015

"A solid motivational text for the sports-minded and those interested in the bridging of athletics and exceptionalism."
The author of a series of mindful golfing guides further explores how to think like a champion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONVERT'S SONG by Sebastian Rotella
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Rotella serves up international intrigue with a delectable twist."
Former Border Agent Valentine Pescatore, now working as a private investigator in Argentina following his undercover misadventures in Triple Crossing (2011), has his life thrown further into chaos following a terrorist attack in Buenos Aires.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRIPLE CROSSING by Sebastian Rotella
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 10, 2011

"A fast-paced thriller that rings true to the real story behind the political posturing over the drug war, illegal immigration and border security."
In his fiction debut, Rotella (Twilight on the Line: Underworlds and Politics at the Mexican Border, 1998) draws a crime novel from the chaotic cauldron of the U.S.-Mexican border. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Powerful exploration of underexamined relationships between labor, culture, and the urban future."
Original, engrossing discussion of emerging class, race, and gender transformations in post-industrial urban America. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARK SUNDEEN
by Megan Labrise

Writing about the simple life proved anything but for immersive journalist Mark Sundeen.

His original manuscript—an unadorned account of three couples who, in varying ways, have opted out of everyday American consumerism—was accepted and revised when he withdrew it from publisher Riverhead Books.

“I had a close friend read it, call me, and say, I stopped reading at page 175 ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

LaRUE FOR MAYOR by Mark  Teague
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

"Though less an election-year primer than a tale for dog lovers of every breed, this merits a spot alongside Doreen Cronin's wickedly satiric Duck For President, illustrated by Betsy Lewin (2004) as a waggish take on the theme. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Giving fans even more reason to "Like Ike"—the dog, that is—Teague pits his irrepressible, letter-writing canine against "Law and Order" candidate Hugo Bugwort in a race for Mayor of Snort City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOVING HOUSE by Mark Siegel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"A stronger message and more coherent magic would have made this charming story even more appealing. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This contemporary eco-fable suffers from a lack of internal logic, but the positive message and attractive retro artwork may still find favor with progressive parents. Read full book review >