Search Results: "Mark Sullivan"


BOOK REVIEW

OUTLAW by Mark Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 2013

"As in Monarch's debut (Rogue, 2012), veteran Sullivan throws every popcorn-movie cliché you can think of into the mix. The result is the most soothingly predictable geopolitical thriller imaginable."
Who you gonna call when a dastardly terrorist cabal kidnaps the foreign ministers of China, India and the U.S.? Master thief and CIA alum Robin Monarch, of course. He'll shake things up for sure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRIVATE GAMES by Mark Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 13, 2012

"A pleasant romp all the same; as lightweight as a whiffleball—but fun."
Zingy formula—emphasis on formula—fiction from the literary maquiladora that is James Patterson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROGUE by Mark Sullivan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Sullivan, who most recently co-authored Private Games (2012) with James Patterson, has long since mastered the art of purging every bit of scenic or psychological interest from his exercises in can-you-top-this plotting. The closest analogies are summer movies from Entrapment to the Mission: Impossible franchise."
Hide the good china: Sullivan (Triple Cross, 2009, etc.) launches a new series with even more helter-skelter action than his stratospheric average. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONAH SEES GHOSTS by Mark Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2003

"A trifle precious in its sentiments but animated by a real sincerity and freshness of outlook."
A grief-stricken teenager strenuously attempts to put to rest the ghost of his dead father—literally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRIVATE BERLIN by James Patterson
Released: Jan. 21, 2013

"Call it cut-rate Bourne, then, with enough action to keep the story moving and enough verisimilitude to belay having to suspend disbelief too often."
Another industrial thriller from the Patterson (Private Games, 2012, etc.) factory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LABYRINTH by Mark T. Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Smashing glass, thudding copter blades, rumbling boulders: Labyrinth has popcorn written all over it."
A clutch of action-movie set pieces in which cavers, scientists, escaped convicts, and the US Cavalry race after a moon rock hidden in a cavern. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SERPENT’S KISS by Mark T. Sullivan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2003

"Familiar territory, yet engaging and satisfying: a good one for a rainy evening."
Just about everything that didn't work in Sullivan's Labyrinth (2002) clicks here. Pace, plotting, description, and characterization are spot on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRIPLE CROSS by Mark T. Sullivan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 16, 2009

"Sullivan's predictable plotting, overdrawn characters and overwrought dialogue and description make it hard to take his plot seriously."
Snow and clichés pile up in the latest from Sullivan (The Serpent's Kiss, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PURIFICATION CEREMONY by Mark T. Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Shorn of the heavy-going mystical ruminations that are bound to be cut, the inevitable movie should be a first-rate actioner. (First printing of 300,000; $250,000 ad/promo)"
Hunters get hunted by a vengeful lunatic in this all-stops- out yarn of the world's worst hunting trip. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FALL LINE by Mark T. Sullivan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"First-novelist Sullivan tries for Hemingway on powder but ends up remaking The Stunt Man with Leni Riefenstahl in the Peter O'Toole role, intercut with soporific flashbacks to a B-grade drug film."
An unintriguing post-felony intrigue with a hero who gets away from it all (dead wife and child, pursuit by Latin American drug lords, burial in federal witness protection program) by hitting the slopes big time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARD NEWS by Mark T. Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Uninspired if workmanlike when focused on McCarthy and LaFontaine, but a real trudge for the other 200 pages."
A convoluted and cluttered journalistic thriller done in by a bloated storyline: a second novel from the author of The Fall Line (1994). Read full book review >