Search Results: "Marlene Röder"


BOOK REVIEW

IN THE RIVER DARKNESS by Marlene Röder
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"This novel is, well…lost in translation. (Fiction. 13 & up)"
Readers will likely have difficulty connecting with this clunky translation of German author Röder's story about a young city girl who moves to the country with her family and quickly finds herself wrapped up in an otherworldly mystery when she befriends the two boys next door. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD IS A BATTLEFIELD by Marlene Perez
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 6, 2012

"Fun for the right audience. (Paranormal suspense. 10-16)"
A high-school freshman learns that she's one of a group of women who fight evil beasties in her supernatural town of Nightshade, Calif. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNEXPECTED DEVELOPMENT by Marlene Perez
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Perez eventually wraps up too many issues way too quickly, ultimately rendering a potentially provocative love story into a sanitizingly unsatisfying issue piece. (Fiction. YA)"
Generously busted Megan has two primary goals for the summer: to have breast-reduction surgery before her sophomore year begins, and to somehow, some way, nab dreamy Jake Darrow, the guy she's had a crush on since seventh grade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO WILL TELL MY BROTHER? by Marlene Carvell
FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"It is a realistically heartening story for teenagers who have a battle to fight, and might also be useful for sparking class discussion. (Fiction. 12-17)"
Evan is a typical high-school student who chooses an a-typical, unpopular position: to ask the PTA to withdraw his school's Indian mascot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 2011

"Plenty of intriguing questions to ponder as Zuk informs adults in a droll style that may also turn on younger readers. After all, entomology is still a field that can begin, as it did for her, with venturing into the yard to collect stuff in a glass jar."
A global sampling of the clever lives and loves of our six-legged friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2013

"Nothing beats good hard data to debunk myths, and Zuk offers plenty."
Zuk (Univ. of California, Riverside; Sex on Six Legs: Lessons on Life, Love, and Language from the Insect World, 2011, etc.) takes on those who say we are ill-suited to modern life because we are trapped in our Stone Age bodies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYRON’S MAGIC COW by Marlene Newman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"A deft, daffy, thought-provoking debut for Newman. (Picture book. 6-8)"
In this faintly surreal urban episode, young Myron is unwillingly dispatched to buy a container of milk, and returns to his apartment with a huge cow—purchased from a glib blonde, who claims she bought it for a handful of beans before speeding away in a car with three bears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A minor effort. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A lighthearted look at two children trying to mend their broken family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 20, 2011

"While the Disney-esque tale feels saccharine at times, the fast-paced, eventful plot will appeal to younger readers who are able to suspend their disbelief and enter a nicer world than our own."
Loftus' young adult novel creates a fantasy world of good kings, evil witches and happily-ever-afters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIARY OF A DRUMMER BOY by Marlene Targ Brill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Abetted by Garland's startling paintings, which depict the faces in a photo-realistic fashion but allow other details in the scenes to remain as sketchy as memory, Brill's book succeeds as fiction, and will have many uses in the history classroom. (bibliography, further reading) (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
A picture book for older readers, based on fact and done in diary form, tells the story of Orion Howe, a 12-year-old Civil War drummer boy who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and who was the subject of an ode in the Atlantic Monthly, reprinted at the back. Read full book review >