Search Results: "Martin Chalmers"


BOOK REVIEW

STORIES OF MR. KEUNER by Bertolt Brecht
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2001

"I am for justice; so it's good if the place in which I'm staying has more than one exit'), but most effectively adumbrated in this revealing coda to an indisputably major, and still challenging, body of work."
The first English translation of the great playwright's discursive semifictionalized observations on German life and politics, as spoken by the eponymous Keuner (his name from the German "keiner," meaning "no man"), a "thinking man" obviously inspired by Plato's Socrates. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT I by Joachim Fest
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"A beautifully written and translated work that creates rare, subtle portraits of Germans."
A stunning portrait of a strenuously anti-Nazi family in Berlin who managed to hang on to their moral convictions during the brutalizing Hitler years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREED by Elfriede Jelinek
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2007

"Much less accessible than Jelinek's best-known work, The Piano Teacher (1983), this is an unrewarding trek across a depressing landscape."
The male drive for property acquisition and sexual conquest is the theme of this murky postmodernist novel from the Austrian writer, winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL’S BLIND SPOT by Alexander Kluge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2004

"Kluge's frequent interrogatory dialogues on all these episodes throw up an array of talking-points that make his work ideal for an avant-garde reading group or post-graduate seminar, though less so for the solitary reader."
In a work that intentionally defies categorization, the elderly German polymath Kluge, a film director as well as writer, offers commentary on love, war, the Devil and the cosmos, from the stars to the oceans, using myth, fables, the historical record and invented dialogues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Authoritative perspectives on a consequential country that remains indominatably foreign for most of the West. (Graphs and tabular material)"
A collection of perceptive essays from a top Asian scholar who sheds considerable light on how Japan managed to become a world- class economic power following its defeat in WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 14, 2000

"Engrossing and at the same time alarming, Johnson's well-researched book nevertheless presents an easy solution to fundamental problems that have usually forced great powers into catastrophic predicaments."
In this timely book, noted Asian specialist Johnson (Japan: Who Governs?, 1994) addresses the effects of American global interventionism, delivering a grim warning that the United States will soon experience severe reprisals (or "blowback") from the victims of government policies kept secret from the American people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO’S WHO IN HELL by Robert Chalmers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A funny and exceptionally well-wrought romance that starts in disaster, ends in tragedy, and never loses sight of the manic and surreal in life."
An assured, entertaining debut about an obituary writer who tries to make his life into something more than a collection of random occurrences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 6, 2007

"A sobering read, though Johnson offers a solution to America's imperial woes: Follow Britain's lead and jettison both empire and the world-policeman role. Given the alternatives, it seems an idea worth exploring."
A paean—perhaps premature, perhaps overdue—for a republic-turned-empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PHYSICAL BODY, THE SPIRITUAL BODY by Ainsley Chalmers
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 21, 2016

"An uneven rhetorical melding of the biochemical and the miraculous."
A biochemist attempts to map the discoveries of his discipline onto traditional beliefs of Christianity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 13, 2004

"Fat chance. And so, Johnson concludes this deeply unsettling essay, 'the United States is probably lost to militarism.'"
A Ciceronian indictment of our nation's transformation from lone superpower to imperial bully. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORTUNE’S BASTARD by Robert Chalmers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Wry and pitch-black send-up of media hubris."
A newspaper editor loathed by most people in the civilized world gets his comeuppance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIGOLD AND GRANDMA ON THE TOWN by Stephanie Calmenson
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"An endearing introduction to someone who could become a real favorite. (Easy reader. 4-8)"
In the spirit of Minarik's Little Bear, four easily read chapters by the author of The Principal's New Clothes (1989). Read full book review >