Search Results: "Martin E. Marty"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Marxist-Leninism."
Something rare: a fair-minded assessment of religious fundamentalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

"Comprehensive and readable, but lacking depth: scholars will find surprisingly little analysis, and no new insights."
The latest addition—succeeding The Irony of It All (1986)— to the projected four-volume survey of 20th-century American religion by the well-known Univ. of Chicago historian (Religion and the Republic, 1987; Pilgrims in Their Own Land, 1984, etc.). ``Will America remain Protestant and Anglo-Saxon?'' According to Marty, this was the central question of the period between the world wars, posed by old-stock Americans and immigrant newcomers alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"His volume will be an important link to retrieving the elusive America of McCarthy, the Cold War, and the Niebuhrs. (illustrations, not seen)"
An excellent history by one of the most distinguished American religious scholars of our time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Unfortunately, recent experience suggests that humans may be more prickly than porcupines."
Marty (Religion/Univ. of Chicago; The Glory and the Power, 1992, etc.) struggles to define a moderate position within an emotionally charged debate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHRISTIAN WORLD by Martin E. Marty
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 2008

"Sturdy church history, vivified by a fresh, though not always seamless approach."
Christian history within the context of continents as well as content. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"Not all readers will agree with Marty's insightful reflections on the relationship between politics and religion, but his essay is a useful starting point for anyone interested in the role of religion in America's public life."
In a thoughtful antidote to the arguments that usually dominate discussions of politics and religion, Marty (The One and Many, 1997, etc.) here invites us instead to enter into a conversation about the relationship between the two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 25, 2012

"While it's not a road map to riches, this comprehensive guide can help lead you to greater financial understanding and maybe even achievement, no matter your income level."
A financial psychologist encourages consumers to take an introspective approach to achieving financial independence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN LUTHER by Martin Marty
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2004

"'Sin boldly,' Luther proclaimed. The only flaw in this bold interpretation, and one by design, is that it is too short. A fine brief on a world-changing figure."
A noted Lutheran historian turns to the founder of his faith, delivering a thoughtful portrait of a complex, controversial figure. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARTIN WILSON
by Megan Labrise

YA author Martin Wilson’s sophomore novel has a gut-punch premise: One hot day in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, an 11-year-old boy takes off on his bike and vanishes. Three years later, he returns, gravely changed.

“I’m trying to write stories that are honest and emotionally powerful,” says Wilson, author of We Now Return to Regular Life, based on a true story ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

AND THEN YOU DIE by James E. Martin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 16, 1992

"A so-so effort."
The third outing for Cleveland shamus Gil Disbro finds him flying to Nevada in search of millionaire Boyd Lassiter's estranged wife, Renee, now mysteriously missing from a dude ranch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 18, 2011

"The authors note that 'the film…will eventually be housed at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum located at Ground Zero.' A fitting complement to and extension of that film, this thoughtful and uplifting collection will also stand on its own."
Eight individuals and how they rebuilt their lives in the aftermath of 9/11. Read full book review >