Search Results: "Martin H. Greenberg"


BOOK REVIEW

DINOSAURS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Still, Anderson's tremendous yarn by itself is probably worth the price of admission, while the other oldies cast a nostalgic glow."
Fourteen more or less archosaurian variations, 195094, compiled by the veteran anthologizer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1991

"Strictly for feline fanatics."
Seventeen new if not overly original stories guaranteed to give you paws—if not pause. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1992

"A simplistic premise, alas, encourages simplistic solutions."
Omnipresent anthologists Gorman and Greenberg suggested to 18 writers that each pound out a story that included one common element: a young woman found dead on an apartment floor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD’S FINEST MYSTERY AND CRIME STORIES by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Thirty-nine stories that are consistently fine, though not superfine."
If 2000 was, on the evidence of Gorman and Greenberg's previous behemoth, a banner year for crime fiction, 2001 was, as baseball managers say, a "building year." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 1984

"Filled out with mediocre contributions from Arthur C. Clarke, Frank Herbert, Robert A. Heinlein, Stanley Schmidt, and Larry Eisenberg: topical yet often bland fare—good enough for politically-oriented diversion, too un-probing to please serious sf fans."
A circumscribed and rather tentative collection of 17 tales, 1941-75. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT CRIMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"As in earlier entries in this long-running series (Cat Crimes Takes a Vacation, 1995, etc.), love of cats shines through a lot more clearly than love of mystery or suspense."
Nineteen new stories commemorating not just the December holidays but a veritable calendar of cats, from New Year's (Barbara Paul) to Martin Luther King Day (Jon L. Breen), Valentine's Day (Jeremiah Healy), Presidents' Day (Peter Crowther and Stewart von Allmen), St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Now that he's survived 60 stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, countless parodies and pastiches, and even two Christmases (Greenberg and Lellenberg's More Holmes for the Holidays, 1999, etc.), what new worlds are left for Sherlock Holmes to conquer? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"First-rate in every way, stories, editing, and as an act of love."
A sheaf of 23 original stories in tribute to Ray Bradbury's 50 years in fantasy and science fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 1987

"Good addition to a popular series of theme anthologies."
These ten very different tales feature young magic-workers, and will appeal to a variety of readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 12, 1982

"Entertaining, often YA-ish, certainly browse-worthy tales—but, overall, mutton dressed as lamb."
Forget the pretentious "dictionary" label: this admittedly mammoth, 50-piece collection—with its contrived categories ("knights," "judicial system," "women," etc.) and haft-witted definitions ("children—persons between infancy and puberty; the offspring of human beings")—is just another gab-bag, despite the noisy packaging. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 1980

"Not for serious sf folk, and no substantial nutrition for anybody—but a serviceable enough bedside anthology for those who get a yen for just a taste of something silly or tricky before going to sleep."
One hundred miniature sf short stories, most of them too gimmicky to induce more than a shrug—but a few old pros do provide some mini-pleasure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1981

"One misses the lighter British touch here, perhaps (and the one Michael Gilbert piece is disappointing), but mystery readers who like a light five-minute read just before bed (or between bus stops) will find this a solid source of mild mini-pleasures."
A generous collection of "short-shorts"—crime stories whose brevity (2000 words or less) is often their major attraction; most of the plot twists here are familiar, but there's no time for the belaboring or padding that afflict so many of the longer mystery-magazine stories. Read full book review >