Search Results: "Martin H. Greenberg"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1991

"Strictly for feline fanatics."
Seventeen new if not overly original stories guaranteed to give you paws—if not pause. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOLVED by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 1991

"Ho-hum, overall, and not as interesting as the true-crime antecedents."
Sixteen short stories—some puckish, several conspiracy- oriented, and all never-published-before (for good reason)—that rework and supposedly ``solve'' various real-life notable mysteries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1992

"A simplistic premise, alas, encourages simplistic solutions."
Omnipresent anthologists Gorman and Greenberg suggested to 18 writers that each pound out a story that included one common element: a young woman found dead on an apartment floor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Once-fresh paths have long since been paved over. (Literary Guild selection)"
Twenty-three pretty unoriginal original short stories set in the American West, gathered by perennial bestseller Jakes (Homeland, not reviewed, etc.) and anthologizing editor Greenberg (Christmas Out West, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURASAKI by Robert Silverberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1992

"Still, if you liked Medea, you'll certainly like this."
Shared-world anthology (of Harlan Ellison's 1985 Medea), using a scenario created by two veteran writers, Poul Anderson and Frederik Pohl (the inspiration here is, of course, the poet Lady Murasaki's famous 11th-century Tale of Genji), and featuring stories by them and the stellar lineup of David Brin, Gregory Benford, Greg Bear, and Nancy Kress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT CRIMES THROUGH TIME by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Now that cats have turned up everywhere from the Scottish Highlands to yesterday's war-torn Beirut, expect next year's dispatch to come from the moons of Jupiter."
Not content with its dominion over the present (Cat Crimes for the Holidays, 1997, etc.), the master race now extends its reach back through history from ancient Egypt to the mid-20th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Now that he's survived 60 stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, countless parodies and pastiches, and even two Christmases (Greenberg and Lellenberg's More Holmes for the Holidays, 1999, etc.), what new worlds are left for Sherlock Holmes to conquer? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1994

"Patchy and discursive, with one or two real delights, some pleasant surprises and an equal number of clunkers."
Actually, not quite original: Grails first appeared in 1992 as a 200,000-word hardcover limited to 1,000 copies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1981

"One misses the lighter British touch here, perhaps (and the one Michael Gilbert piece is disappointing), but mystery readers who like a light five-minute read just before bed (or between bus stops) will find this a solid source of mild mini-pleasures."
A generous collection of "short-shorts"—crime stories whose brevity (2000 words or less) is often their major attraction; most of the plot twists here are familiar, but there's no time for the belaboring or padding that afflict so many of the longer mystery-magazine stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCIENCE FICTION WEIGHT-LOSS BOOK by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 1982

"Simply scrumptious—however familiar some items on the menu."
At first glance this might appear an implausible anthology idea—but the upshot is a deliciously varied and diverting set of 15 yarns, from H. G. Wells to the present, examining obesity in all its ghastly guises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THE KING by Martin H. Greenberg
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"The Halfling House,'' egregious at 29 pages) that would have made Tolkien himself wince—but, still, the strongest tales here are among the best short-length fantasy of the year."
Yet another Festschrift anthology by Greenberg, who has recently edited or coedited tributes to Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, and H.P. Lovecraft, this time to honor the much-imitated author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Read full book review >