Search Results: "Martin J. Sherwin"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2005

"A swiftly moving narrative full of morality tales and juicy gossip. One of the best scientific biographies to appear in recent years."
The second greatest scientific mind of the atomic era gets respectful but revealing treatment by political journalist Bird (The Color of Truth, 1998) and literary scholar Sherwin (A World Destroyed, 1975). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECYCLING by Martin J. Gutnik
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1993

"Glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A meager introduction to an important subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXPERIMENTS THAT EXPLORE RECYCLING by Martin J. Gutnik
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 15, 1992

"Further reading; glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Ten experiments to help young ecologists understand the need to recycle and to safeguard the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 8, 2014

"Credit Blaser for displaying the wonders and importance of a vast underworld we are jeopardizing but cannot live without."
Infectious disease specialist Blaser makes an impassioned plea for maintaining the biodiversity of the ecosystem that exists in and on our bodies: the human microbiome. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMBUSTION by Martin J. Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Smith's bite-sized chapters keep the pot boiling—even if many of the ingredients here are familiar, they're expertly mixed—and the denouement will likely pack a punch even for readers who've seen it coming."
Journalist/thriller writer Smith (The Wild Duck Chase, 2012, etc.) uses the death of a successful developer to dig deep into the victim's family and the California landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Looking Down On Leaders  by Iain J. Martin
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"An entertaining romp through corporate life that covers pithy truths in a sugar coating of funny, memorable anecdotes."
An executive coach by trade, Martin, in his debut, takes a look at the lighter side of leadership. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION

"A comprehensive account of an American drug calamity."
A neurologist details the plight of a dangerous antibiotic potion in this medical history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COAL PICKER by Martin J. Hula
Released: Feb. 23, 2013

"An original, compelling hybrid of period novel, murder mystery and bildungsroman."
Hula's debut novel portrays the fear, violence and small acts of grace in a small coal-mining town during early union-busting efforts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DINOSAURS WITHOUT BONES by Anthony J. Martin
NON-FICTION
Released: March 12, 2014

"Most scholarly attempts at comedy, including this one, make for a painful experience, but readers who can tolerate the relentlessly glib, jokey prose will learn a great deal about these fascinating, long-dead creatures."
Paleontologist Martin (Environmental Sciences/Emory Univ.; Life Traces of the Georgia Coast: Revealing the Unseen Lives of Plants and Animals, 2013, etc.) has written textbooks, but this is his first work for a popular audience, and his choice to use humor as an educational tool meets with mixed results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 18, 2012

"An interesting bit of Americana well reported."
As Orange Coast editor in chief Smith (Straw Men, 2001, etc.) reports, the Federal Duck Stamp Program is one of the most successful government programs ever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"Overheated prose and much repetition, not to mention the grim subject matter, make this an unpleasant—but vital—read."
Schram (Avoiding Armageddon, 2003, etc.) combines history, investigative journalism, advocacy and diatribe as he criticizes each branch of the federal government for its abysmal treatment of needy war veterans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A spry exercise in popular science. Can you dig it?"
Explosions, fires, asteroid collisions, predators: there are good reasons to go underground for critters of many descriptions, as this lightly written, pleasant survey reveals. Read full book review >