Search Results: "Martin van Creveld"


BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN VAN BUREN by Ted Widmer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2005

"Well written and sensible—especially when Widmer notes that 'it's antidemocratic to expect all of our leaders to be great.' Q.E.D."
Pity poor Martin Van Buren: reviled in life, ignored in death, undistinguished enough that biographers have had a hard time finding much to say about him. Until now. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CULTURE OF WAR by Martin van Creveld
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 2008

"Neither pro- nor anti-, the author treats war as a natural human activity and makes a good case in this well-delineated account of the traditions, rituals and laws that accompany it."
In a lengthy but never boring volume, prolific military historian van Creveld (History/Hebrew Univ.; The Changing Face of War: Lessons of Combat, from the Marne to Iraq, 2007, etc.) offers a rich, satisfying examination of the role war has played since the Stone Age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 16, 1993

"A perceptive study that affords a measure of cold comfort on the score of deterrence."
A somewhat reassuring audit of the residual threat posed by nuclear weapons, from a military analyst whose previous predictions have proved chillingly prescient. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 3, 2010

"A concise history by an author confident with his scope and authority—but beware that van Creveld has a considerable axe to grind."
An authoritative history, and glib patriotic defense, by a veteran historian of Israel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AGE OF AIRPOWER by Martin van Creveld
NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2011

"A polished, readable narrative by an expert."
An opinionated, technical survey of air warfare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORE ON WAR by Martin van Creveld
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2017

"Should appeal beyond the usual readership of military histories."
A definitive treatment of the theory and philosophy of war by a leading military historian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Drawing extensively on Hebrew-language sources, this serves as a useful corrective to American worship of the IDF, though perhaps it's pitched too much the other way."
Van Creveld (History/Hebrew Univ.) offers a comprehensive account of the Israeli armed forces, tracing it back to its pre-state predecessors in the beginning of this century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Van Ripplewink by Paul Clayton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 2016

"A serious novel with an amusing premise."
Clayton (In the Shape of a Man, 2013, etc.) updates the story of Rip Van Winkle in this social novel.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN JOHNSON by Ronald L. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A perfectly pleasant double feature."
The Van Johnson Story. Starring . . . Van Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN MORRISON by Johnny Rogan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2006

"Sprightly despite its amplitude, a narrative of propulsive drive that is also a reflective, associative piece of social history."
Nearly breath-by-breath biography of the influential Irish musician who has made a dent in rock, blues, folk, country and jazz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN AMIS by Richard Bradford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 12, 2012

"Just serviceable. Readers interested in all things Amis will want to refer to the roman à clef The Information and anxiously await an autobiography."
Indifferently written bio of "the best prose stylist in English…in the closing decades of the last and the opening of this century." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN BAUMAN; by David Leavitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2000

"Nonetheless, the gossip value alone should make this Leavitt's most popular book. It's also his best since his early successes, Family Dancing (1984) and The Lost Language of Cranes (1986): a cri de coeur that's intelligent, funny, and genuinely revealing."
What might almost have been Leavitt's first novel is instead the presumably autobiographical stuff of his ambitious fifth: an alternately lighthearted and turgid chronicle of a young writer's pursuit of love and fame in the New York literary world of the early 1980s. Read full book review >