Search Results: "Mary Ann Esposito"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Complete, authoritative and accessible guide to Italian ingredients, cooking and cuisine."
A primer for authentic Italian cooking from the host of the long-running PBS show Ciao Italia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 23, 1991

Deep roots and warm memories inform this companion volume to the PBS series of the same name, by the Italian-American cooking teacher who grew up draping homemade pasta over a broom handle hung between two kitchen chairs...and then spent time in Italy learning and teaching other regional specialties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PET SHOP LULLABY by Mary Ann Fraser
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"A nifty approach to problem solving, a peek at the difference between diurnal and nocturnal and a good argument as to why light sleepers should not keep a hamster as a pet. (Picture book. 2-6)"
When it comes to a good night's sleep, hamster is a problem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

A dramatic recreation of that final, climactic morning in 1953 when New Zealand beekeeper Edmund Hillary and his veteran Sherpa companion, Tenzing Norgay, climbed the last 1100 feet to stand on Earth's highest point. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1993

"Concluding note; bibliography. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
In the context of building the entire Transcontinental Railroad, a detailed account of April 28, 1869, when—as the result of a $10,000 wager—Central Pacific crews laid a record- setting ten miles of track. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I.Q., IT’S TIME by Mary Ann Fraser
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2005

"A comforting look at what to expect from kindergarten by an already beloved character. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The focus is on schedules and routines in I.Q.'s latest time-centered outing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW ANIMAL BABIES STAY SAFE by Mary Ann Fraser
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2002

"No new ground is broken here, but baby animals do have an eternal appeal to the young of the species that can read. (author's note) (Nonfiction. 5-7)"
This addition to the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series offers a broad look at the way young animals are protected by their parents and by their own instincts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE GIANT LEAP by Mary Ann Fraser
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"Glossary. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 9-11)"
Based on authoritative sources, a vivid account of the Apollo 11 mission by the author of On Top of the World: The Conquest of Mount Everest (1991). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERMAID SISTER by Mary Ann Fraser
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2008

"A fine addition to storytimes on siblings or the sea. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Shelly's little brother Gordy is "a pain in the patootie." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEEBIE-JEEBIE JAMBOREE by Mary Ann Fraser
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"Anyone for eyes cream or barbecued bat wings? A rollerghoster of fun for younger trick-or-treaters. (Picture book. 4-7)"
What kid doesn't want to be spooked on Halloween? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I.Q. GOES TO SCHOOL by Mary Ann Fraser
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Fraser's overall handling is tender, totally focused on the development level of the reader, and sensitive to the needs of the young student who will be learning just like I.Q. Now on to camp. (Picture book. 5-7)"
All through the school year, I.Q., the class's pet mouse, wants to be student of the week; he has done everything the class has done, but everyone seems to ignore him as a candidate, regardless of his attentiveness to the literary arts, science, math, crafts, and recess. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I.Q. GOES TO THE LIBRARY by Mary Ann Fraser
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"EWSLUGp1985 or Marc Brown's D.W.'s Library Card (2001), this artfully conveys both the basics of how most libraries are organized, and a sense of why they're the place to be. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Opening and closing with a handful of precious but on-target ground rules—"To keep the books looking new, never mark, draw, cut, or glue"—this barely disguised tutorial follows a mouse and his human classmates through a week's worth of visits to their school library. I.Q. wants the storybook Mrs. Binder, the librarian, reads on Monday, and on each successive day he gets closer to finding it—meanwhile discovering the fiction, nonfiction, and nonprint sections, making a bookmark, using the online catalogue, and at last getting his own library card. Read full book review >