Search Results: "Mary Bahr"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MEMORY BOX by Mary Bahr
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1992

"Upbeat, but also sensible and perceptive. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When Zach comes for his annual vacation, Gramps has just learned that he has Alzheimer's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 2007

"Intermittently chuckle-worthy tale that never lives up to its once-in-a-lifetime title."
Semi-virginal Israeli army-intelligence vet picks up her backpack and heads east, drawn by the prospect of travel and potential deflowering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACK FLOWER by Howard Bahr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1997

"A bleakly effective and economical account of men and women caught up in a bestial conflict. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection)"
Bahr makes an impressive debut with a haunting tale of a brief but bloody encounter on the road to Nashville, which helped put paid to the Confederate cause in the latter stages of America's Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR OF JUBILO by Howard Bahr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"The Year of Jubilo is a triumphant giant step forward for Bahr. (Author tour)"
A brilliantly woven Civil War story about the "jubilant" year (1865) following the supposed cessation of hostilities, from the author of the highly praised (and rather similar) debut novel The Black Flower (1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JUDAS FIELD by Howard Bahr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Carefully written and nuanced, akin to Frederick Busch's Night Inspector as much as to Michael Shaara's Killer Angels."
A well-realized vision of war's hell, ghosts and all. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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BLOG POST

CABINS IN THE WOODS
by Leila Roy

There were twenty-five letters in all. They went to girls who lived in apartment buildings in cities and farmhouses in the country and condos in the suburbs. Each letter invited its recipient to spend a week at Camp So-and-So, a lakeside retreat for girls nestled high in the Starveling Mountains, on a merit scholarship. Each letter came with a registration ...
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BOOK REVIEW

CERTIFIABLY INSANE by Arthur W. Bahr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1999

"Though the hell-hath-no-fury plot couldn't be more familiar (especially to fans of Richard Gere movies), Bahr's portrait of his homicidal heroine and her victims is so nuanced that the familiar plot twists seem, if not exactly fresh, then genuinely creepy. (Mystery Guild featured alternate)"
Bahr's posthumous first novel trains a microscope on a killer's insanity defense and its chilling, though predictable, aftermath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WON'T COMB MY HAIR! by Annette Langen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"The lenticular optical-illusion cover is a bonus treat. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Craziness ensues when a girl lets her locks grow wild. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BALL by Mary Sullivan
by Mary Sullivan, illustrated by Mary Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2013

"Deceptively simple little winner for dog lovers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The single word "ball" comprises the text of this visual chronicle of a day in the life of a dog and his ball. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A KISS LIKE THIS by Mary Murphy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 11, 2012

"Slim? Fleeting? Predictable? Yes, but the youngest listeners won't mind. Sure to inspire lots of cuddles and lip smacks. (Picture book. 1-3)"
Murphy (Utterly Lovely One, 2011) produces another bright slip of a title just right for the youngest toddlers. Read full book review >