Search Results: "Mary Evelyn Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

WHEN RAIN HURTS by Mary Evelyn Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A useful, inspiring cautionary tale for prospective adoptive parents."
A searingly candid chronicle of the heroic struggle of two adoptive parents to raise their multiply disabled son. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2009

"Contrary to its expectation-raising subtitle, a sad story of no compelling current import. For more historical context, see Gavin Mortimer's The Great Swim (2008)."
Workmanlike biography of the first woman to swim the English Channel demonstrates that fame is fleeting and a moment of youthful glory is no guarantee of a glamorous life. Read full book review >

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MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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CABINS IN THE WOODS
by Leila Roy

There were twenty-five letters in all. They went to girls who lived in apartment buildings in cities and farmhouses in the country and condos in the suburbs. Each letter invited its recipient to spend a week at Camp So-and-So, a lakeside retreat for girls nestled high in the Starveling Mountains, on a merit scholarship. Each letter came with a registration ...
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BOOK REVIEW


"A slice-of-life from a small-town existence."
In a collection of columns from The Easley Progress, McCollum (Nalley, A Southern Family Story, 2002) offers mostly heartwarming tales of her family and the hamlet in which she grew up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DOLL'S HOUSE by Evelyn Anthony
Released: Aug. 3, 1992

"Seamlessly styled entertainment—with tight action and a wry, ironic close."
Again, Anthony (The Relic, 1991, etc. etc.) melds romantic suspense and espionage thrills for a spirited diversion—this time involving a love affair that bobs crazily around a plot to rub out an Arab prince. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNAWAY by Evelyn Lau
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Outspoken but without insight, naive but capable of inflicting great pain: Lau's adolescent reflections aredespite their shock valueno more than that."
Sex, drugs, and an obsession with ``my writing'' dominate this self-absorbed journal of a nonetheless remarkable teenager. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"A nice grrrl, but not much of a riot."
A rock 'n' roll girl embraces motherhood, pens self-indulgent memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVED ONE by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 23, 1948

"Certainly not a even for Waugh addicts."
Entertaining as Evelyn Waugh's practiced wit may be, the mockery here seems a little macabre for all tastes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD OF HONOUR by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Nov. 2, 1966

"Some critics, Malcolm Muggeridge for instance, considered this ironic, absurd, affecting (and autobiographical) portrait of a middle aged man at war his finest achievement."
Both a "recension" (Waugh before his death excised some of the original material) as well as a one-volume publication of the World War II trilogy— Men at Arms (1952) Officers and Gentleman (1955) and Unconditional Surrender (1961) which Waugh thought of as "obituary of the Roman Catholic Church in England." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIARIES OF EVELYN WAUGH by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 25, 1977

All different kinds of people are going to be disappointed by these heavily heralded diaries—kept by England's most acerbic schoolboy, playboy, traveler, soldier, and novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELENA by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 16, 1950

"An intellectual invention which is not without its spiritual significance, this still does not subdue the occasional bright badinage, the wit which is a worldly one, although it will be the name that will carry this to its audience."
A retelling of the story of St. Read full book review >