Search Results: "Mary Gordon"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LIAR'S WIFE by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"What Gordon sometimes lacks in subtlety is often made up for by the passion and energy of a questioning mind made all the more vital as she ages with her characters."
Fans of the author will welcome these four novellas for their familiar themes and rich characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHADOW MAN by Mary Gordon
NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 1996

"Beautiful, painful, shocking, a profound exploration of love, memory, shame, recuperation—a remarkable work. (Author tour)"
In this searing memoir, Gordon, noted as a novelist of Catholic lives in America, searches for the truth about her late father—a Jew who converted to Catholicism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REST OF LIFE by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"In their rarefied atmosphere, her lovers' passion is a pale fire and, finally, unconvincing."
Convoluted meditations by women on love and displacement—in Gordon's first fiction since The Other Side (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF MARY GORDON by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"A welcome reminder of this still-evolving writer's steadfast mindfulness and clarity of vision."
Often concerned with themes of Catholic faith in both nonfiction (Joan of Arc, 2000) and fiction (Pearl, 2005), the versatile Gordon demonstrates her stylistic staying power in 41 stories written over several decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEARL by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 18, 2005

"Elegant prose, thought-provoking plot, mammoth themes—and sometimes slow-going."
An overly intense, multilayered tale about three characters facing a life-and-death situation, a state of affairs brought into being by religion, class, social consciousness, and political activism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPENDING by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 2, 1998

"Not Gordon's best, but well worth reading. (Author tour)"
What might be called a kind of feminist apostasy suffuses this often entertaining but ultimately disappointing fifth novel from the author of The Rest of Life (1993), among other fiction, and a recent memoir, The Shadow Man (1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVE OF MY YOUTH by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2011

"Despite the elegant prose Gordon fans expect, both Miranda's self-consciousness and Adam's smugness infect the author, causing the novel and its characters to remain slightly off-putting."
After recently publishing more nonfiction (Reading Jesus, 2009, etc.), Gordon (The Stories of Mary Gordon, 2006, etc.) returns to the novel form in this examination of first love revisited. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLING MY MOTHER by Mary Gordon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 14, 2007

"A pointillist accumulation of moments that movingly invokes speculation, introspection, loss and its habitual companion, regret."
Fiction writer Gordon (Pearl, 2005, etc.) grapples with the legacy of her complex, troubled mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOAN OF ARC by Mary Gordon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"A bold 'biographical meditation' that persuades the skeptic to meditate on the inexplicable something Joan made happen, and keeps on happening, to this day. (First serial to Commonweal; author tour)"
Illiterate adolescent peasant girl, prompted by inner voices, turns knight-redeemer of her country—temporarily. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THERE YOUR HEART LIES by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 9, 2017

"An emotionally and historically rich work with a strong character portrait holding together its disparate parts."
Shifting points in time and points of view reveal a young woman shaped by the zealotry that can emanate from family, faith, or war. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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