Search Results: "Mary Lee Settle"


BOOK REVIEW

LEARNING TO FLY by Mary Lee Settle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"So, is some Settle better than none? A resounding yes."
When she died in 2005, novelist and memoirist Settle (Spanish Recognitions: The Roads to the Present, 2004, etc.) was still working on this affecting memoir of her experiences before, during and after World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADDIE by Mary Lee Settle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The author captures them in a kind of chorus of life and death that has now set her free."
Addie's granddaughter, the author, is the real subject here, in a delicate exploration of growing up that gives weight to the land, to the economy, to the river, and most of all, of course, to complex family relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHOICES by Mary Lee Settle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"A counter-myth of the southern belle, this entertaining and fully imagined re-creation would make a great miniseries. (Author tour)"
Wearing its liberal heart on its sleeve, the 13th novel by National Book Award-winner Settle has the same historic sweep and personalized politics as her acclaimed Beulah Quintet (Charley Bland, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Travel-writing in the tradition of Jan Morris and Paul Theroux, recounting sojourns that are never entirely comfortable, never really dangerous, but full of surprises and pleasures."
A graceful memoir of solo travel in post-Franco Spain, bookending the author's equally graceful Turkish Reflections (1991). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 17, 1991

"But, more, she does for Turkey what only the most accomplished travel writers do: shows why it is a place that must be visited, then makes it seem as if her readers have just come home from there."
Everyone, it seems, wanted a piece of this superior travelogue by the National Book Award-winning author of Blood Tie, The Beulah Quintet, and Celebration—which is why parts of it are slated to run in Traveler, The New York Times Magazine, and Travel and Leisure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Beveled Edges and Mitered Corners by Mary Elizabeth Lee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 9, 2015

"Not afraid to enter casual mode for the big things, one's own mortality included. An apt choice for the earthliness of our lives."
A pleasant, versatile first book of poems by Lee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WON'T YOU COME AND PLAY WITH ME? by Mary Lee Donovan
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

A catchy nursery rhyme about the adventures of a boy as he meanders through errands for his mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"An eye-opener for anyone concerned about concussion—which the authors persuasively argue should include everyone."
Powerful advocacy for an emerging therapy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPA'S BEDTIME STORY by Mary Lee Donovan
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A lovely book to share. (Picture book. 2-8)"
A story that elaborates the pattern of the circular tale beginning ``It was a dark and stormy night.'' Here, it's ``a warm and rumbling night in June'' when, in a peaceful and cozy cabin, a baby says, ``tell me a bedtime story.'' Papa's story begins in the same way as the book, but now it's a barn owl begging for a story, while his papa's tale concerns a family of chipmunks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1994

"Nevertheless, the cumulative effect of the collection is invigorating and should bring recognition to some lesser-known writers whose originality deserves applause."
This anthology of recent experimental fiction selected by past and present editors of the Iowa Review is a mixed bag containing many a chuckle, an occasional yawn, and perhaps half a dozen true revelations. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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BLOG POST

CABINS IN THE WOODS
by Leila Roy

There were twenty-five letters in all. They went to girls who lived in apartment buildings in cities and farmhouses in the country and condos in the suburbs. Each letter invited its recipient to spend a week at Camp So-and-So, a lakeside retreat for girls nestled high in the Starveling Mountains, on a merit scholarship. Each letter came with a registration ...
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