Search Results: "Mary McGarry Morris"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST MOTHER by Mary McGarry Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 24, 2005

"A mother remorselessly abandons her children in a cheap tearjerker."
A Depression-era, lachrymose saga targeting the latest fashionable villain in literature: the absent mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONGS IN ORDINARY TIME by Mary McGarry Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 24, 1995

"A grand sweep of a novel: Morris, like a contemporary Dickens, creates a world teeming with incident and characters often foolish, even nasty, but always alive and in your face. (First printing of 75,000; $75,000 ad/promo)"
From the justly touted author of Vanished (a 1988 NBA nominee) and A Dangerous Woman (1991) comes this panoramic view of small- town lifea novel infused with empathy for the flawed and failed who live there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIONA RANGE by Mary McGarry Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"But, ultimately, this soap opera—like tale is repetitive and the answers to those secrets are hardly surprising. (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
Morris (Oprah-anointed Songs in Ordinary Time, 1995, etc.) weaves the tale of a troubled 30-year-old woman searching desperately for love, acceptance, and ultimately her own identity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HOLE IN THE UNIVERSE by Mary McGarry Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2004

"Morris has all the tools. But they need sharpening, and better raw material."
A sprawling fifth outing from Oprah favorite Morris (Songs in Ordinary Time, 1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACTS OF GOD by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Needs a shot of adrenaline."
A middle-aged woman who can't seem to get her life in focus realizes the past is bogging her down—in this melancholy new novel by Morris, a superb travel writer (Angels and Aliens, 1998, etc.) whose fictional achievements continue to be erratic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE ARREST by Mary Morris
Released: May 1, 1996

"Not this masterful author's best work."
An American travel writer is forcibly detained on a Soviet- linked Caribbean island in this fourth novel from Morris—a murky, claustrophobic work that fails to penetrate the depths of the author's previous fiction (most recently, A Mother's Love, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAITING ROOM by Mary Morris
Released: May 22, 1989

Three generations of midwestern women deal with the loss of idyllic first love; in her second novel, Morris (Vanishing Animals, 1979; Crossroads, 1982; Nothing to Declare, 1988) dips erratically into the past, and comes up empty-handed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER QUEEN by Mary Morris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2007

"Serenely calibrated, pleasant and heartfelt."
Rambling author Morris (Revenge, 2004, etc.) hires a houseboat and captain to take her down the Mississippi on the trail of Mark Twain and the father she missed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REVENGE by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Morris's latest is as anemic as her previous (Acts of God, 2000)."
Obsessed by the accident that killed her father, a woman confides her misgivings to a famous novelist in this, Morris's eighth work of fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JAZZ PALACE by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2015

"Atmospheric but amorphous, Morris' restless novel works hard to encompass a cultural moment."
A panoramic portrait of jazz-era Chicago, where, against a background of speak-easies, racial tension and gangsters, a Jewish boy with a talent for "the devil's music" observes and participates in the vibrancy of the day. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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