Search Results: "Mary Morris"


BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE ARREST by Mary Morris
Released: May 1, 1996

"Not this masterful author's best work."
An American travel writer is forcibly detained on a Soviet- linked Caribbean island in this fourth novel from Morris—a murky, claustrophobic work that fails to penetrate the depths of the author's previous fiction (most recently, A Mother's Love, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACTS OF GOD by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Needs a shot of adrenaline."
A middle-aged woman who can't seem to get her life in focus realizes the past is bogging her down—in this melancholy new novel by Morris, a superb travel writer (Angels and Aliens, 1998, etc.) whose fictional achievements continue to be erratic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JAZZ PALACE by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2015

"Atmospheric but amorphous, Morris' restless novel works hard to encompass a cultural moment."
A panoramic portrait of jazz-era Chicago, where, against a background of speak-easies, racial tension and gangsters, a Jewish boy with a talent for "the devil's music" observes and participates in the vibrancy of the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1991

"Still, it's an interesting installment in the story of how she changes as she moves over the earth, raising expectations for a third volume documenting future journeys, perhaps with a baby on board."
The further travels of Morris, short-story writer and novelist (The Bus of Dreams, 1985, etc.) and author of Nothing to Declare, which documented her adventures as a woman alone on the road in Central America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LAZY EYE by Mary Morrissy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1996

"Stories that are among the finest when at their best, then, though others haven't grown into their new skin, still shaking off the artifice and feel of the classroom."
From Dublin-based Morrissy (Mother of Pearl, 1995), 15 stories that at their best sing with feeling, though the strain of artifice at other times threatens to damp the tone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIFEGUARD by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"But there are also exquisitely revealing moments, and clearly Morris hasn't lost her touch as a story writer. (Author tour)"
Morris's third collection (Vanishing Animals, 1975; The Bus of Dreams, 1985) shows some of the flair for yarnspinning missed in her last novel, House Arrest (1996), but repetition lessens the overall impact of the ten tales here (nine previously published). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MOTHER'S LOVE by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 1993

"So, poetry—without much of the messy stuff of life."
Single motherhood is the ostensible subject of Morris's second novel (after Crossroads, 1983; plus several story collections and a duet of travelogues). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAITING ROOM by Mary Morris
Released: May 22, 1989

Three generations of midwestern women deal with the loss of idyllic first love; in her second novel, Morris (Vanishing Animals, 1979; Crossroads, 1982; Nothing to Declare, 1988) dips erratically into the past, and comes up empty-handed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REVENGE by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Morris's latest is as anemic as her previous (Acts of God, 2000)."
Obsessed by the accident that killed her father, a woman confides her misgivings to a famous novelist in this, Morris's eighth work of fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER QUEEN by Mary Morris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2007

"Serenely calibrated, pleasant and heartfelt."
Rambling author Morris (Revenge, 2004, etc.) hires a houseboat and captain to take her down the Mississippi on the trail of Mark Twain and the father she missed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER OF PEARL by Mary Morrissy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1995

"Boldly painted and full of promise, but not quite finished."
A triptych about motherhood—portraits of three troubled women whose stories are deeply, darkly, inextricably linked—from critic and first-novelist Morrissy, fiction reviewer for The Irish Times. Read full book review >