Search Results: "Mary Pat Kelly"


BOOK REVIEW

OF IRISH BLOOD by Mary Pat Kelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"In a novel so awed by the great and near-great, ordinary human characters are outgunned."
An Irish-American from Chicago, fleeing an abusive relationship, moves to Paris on the eve of World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPECIAL INTENTIONS by Mary Pat Kelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 1998

"The result seems too light a take on a heavy subject."
First novel by an Irish-American former nun that's more a spirited reprise of the Roman Catholic Church's response to the spiritual and temporal changes of the 1960s than an engrossing tale of a young nun's growing disillusionment with convent life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALWAY BAY by Mary Pat Kelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 2009

"A satisfying tale, with few surprises for those who know the territory, but no false steps."
Historically accurate epic of the Irish potato famine veers into gothic romance territory but keeps its eye on the Fenian prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN SCORSESE by Mary Pat Kelly
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"That's exactly the sort of identity crisis this book suffers from—it aspires to critical seriousness but delivers mostly starlust."
Kelly's second book on the acclaimed director has the same patchwork quality as her Martin Scorsese: The First Decade (1980- -not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMPERIAL KELLY by Peter Bowen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Kelly's ribald adventures can usually wear down the resistance of even the most cynical reader as history is revised with a vengeance."
Charming, wily Luther Kelly (Kelly Blue, 1991, etc.) follows orders from a blackmailing Theodore Roosevelt—orders that will take him around the world via Cuba, South Africa, and the Philippines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KELLY PARK by Jean Stubbs
Released: July 21, 1992

"A minor disappointment from an accomplished writer."
Stubbs follows her excellent, complex Light in Summer (1991) with this less successful tale of a female chef who transforms a crumbling English villa into a prosperous country inn—wherein the heroine's motives remain less than clear and the plot surprisingly predictable and trite. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY by Tomie dePaola
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"The interesting conceit behind these illustrationsto take children's book figures and place them in formal icon-like posesworks well. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A strongly religious book featuring 15 scenes from the life of Mary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY by Hillary Monahan
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"An urban legend too light on either gore or camp to be any fun. (Horror. 14-18)"
Four friends face the dire consequences of summoning the infamous Bloody Mary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KELLY + VICTOR by Niall Griffiths
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 15, 2004

"Modern romance? More like an exorcism of writerly boredom."
The fourth from Welsh author Griffiths (Sheepshagger, 2002, etc.) gives vent to wasted urban youth via sadistic sex and feisty vernacular. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAT-A-CAKE by Mary Brigid Barrett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"With its companion title, a playful romp in a please-touch-and-explore world. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
Moving on from baked goods, a diverse group of toddlers pat everything from an acorn to a puddle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAT THE CAT by Jacqui Hawkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 22, 2011

"This irresistible app gets everything right, proving that simplicity is sometimes best. (iPad storybook app. 2-7)"
Based on the picture book of the same name, this charming app is a flawless combination of music, sound effects, narration and interactive elements. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1970

"The story is a slight thing at best—a frail straw in the wind."
This is Nabokov's first novel (Mashenka), more properly novella, which is best read for its germinal indications of the later works to follow: particularly the theme of the emigre in transition which will be so triumphantly realized in another habitat, Pnin; and the retrospective refrains of Speak, Memory. Read full book review >