Search Results: "Mary Rodgers"


BOOK REVIEW

FREAKY FRIDAY by Mary Rodgers
Released: April 12, 1972

Gregor Samsa's "Metamorphosis" to insect form is no more disconcerting than the opening of Freaky Friday: "When I woke up this morning, I found I'd turned into my mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER SWITCH by Mary Rodgers
Released: Sept. 22, 1982

"More important, the mixups along the way are hilariously funny."
Having hit the comedy switch with Freaky Friday (1972), which put 13-year-old Annabel Andrews into her mother's body for a brief spell of household hassles, Rodgers generates as many laughs by having Annabel's younger brother Ben, now twelve, switch bodies with his father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BILLION FOR BORIS by Mary Rodgers
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"This leaves Boris, who has essentially learned his lesson without suffering for his mistakes, blubbering with joy — but it's poor reward for readers who have taken in all the cheap crises and social insensitivity of Freaky Friday without any of the compensating laughs."
When Boris, Annabel's upstairs boyfriend in Freaky Friday (KR, 1972), acquires a TV set that broadcasts tomorrow's programs, Annabel wants to use their foreknowledge for good deeds like helping the police entertain a lost child or providing a Daily News journalist with scoops, but Boris has bigger plans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 29, 1970

"Once again, it will no doubt be personally promoted, with Her and Her appearances?"
A mother-and-daughter collaboration—black print for D.R., brown for M.R., with conveniently annotated margins re the soi-disant content as well as illustrations—obviously something for both generations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREAKY MONDAY by Mary Rodgers
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 5, 2009

"Freaky Friday (1972), this story, although it lacks its predecessor's infinite smarts, is sufficiently amusing to keep kids interested and engaged. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Switching bodies with your mom or dad is one thing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROTTEN BOOK by Steven Kellogg
Released: Sept. 24, 1969

"And suppose he didn't eat the **** egg — would he have to feel rotten?"
The Rotten Book is really two books, a worldly satire and a simple, rather old-fashioned cautionary tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITHUANIA by Mary M. Rodgers
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"A useful summary, but without the kind of detail that would engender interest in, or even sympathy, for this much-beleaguered people. (Nonfiction. 10+)"
One of the first four titles in the "Then and Now" series, about the republics of the former USSR (the others are Estonia; Latvia; and Russia). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEWHERE ELSE by Leni Rodgers
Released: Nov. 21, 2011

"Inspirational historical fiction based one woman's remarkable life and travels."
Based on a true story, Rodgers presents a moving novel that pays tribute to the power of an adventurous spirit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"In his energetic memoir, Rodgers, as was almost always the case with his songs, brings the funk."
One of the heaviest figures from an unjustly maligned musical era tells all, and tells it well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"An astute and independent observer's engrossing (albeit unsparing) perspectives on one of the 20th century's genuinely consequential enterprises. (illustrations, not seen)"
An evenhanded and informative history of Boeing, the American airframe manufacturer that bestrides the world of civil aviation like a colossus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET SISTERS by Joni Rodgers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"It's a slog following these three women through so many pages of depressing action before the slightest bit of sunshine is revealed in an ending that's neither satisfying nor shocking."
A drunk-driving accident has dire ramifications for a tight-knit family. Read full book review >