Search Results: "Mary Tavener Holmes"


BOOK REVIEW

MY TRAVELS WITH CLARA by Mary Tavener Holmes
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 10, 2007

"Like Mary Jo Collier's King's Giraffe, illustrated by Stéfane Poulin (1996), this is an engaging animal story that also provides a glimpse of a time when Europeans were at last awakening to the world's size and wonder. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Spun from a true historical episode and illustrated with a mix of simply drawn cartoons and 18th-century prints and paintings, this affectionate memoir recalls visits to the great cities of Europe in the company of an exotic Indian rhinoceros. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ELEPHANT FROM BAGHDAD by Mary Tavener Holmes
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"Captivating and charming both as animal story and as a glimpse of historical East/West relations. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Holmes, Harris and Cannel (A Giraffe Goes to Paris, 2010) again team up to tell a tale about a large exotic animal who historically ventured into European/Western territory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIRAFFE GOES TO PARIS by Mary Tavener Holmes
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2010

"George and illustrated by Britt Spencer, on the shelf. (Picture book. 5-8)"
From the scorching Egyptian desert to bustling Paris, this historically inspired account describes the remarkable trip of a young guide who brings an unusual gift to the French king. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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BLOG POST

CABINS IN THE WOODS
by Leila Roy

There were twenty-five letters in all. They went to girls who lived in apartment buildings in cities and farmhouses in the country and condos in the suburbs. Each letter invited its recipient to spend a week at Camp So-and-So, a lakeside retreat for girls nestled high in the Starveling Mountains, on a merit scholarship. Each letter came with a registration ...
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BOOK REVIEW

THE DISTANCE BETWEEN LOST AND FOUND by Kathryn Holmes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"Vivid, gripping and believable from beginning to end—a strong debut. (Fiction. 13-16)"
Hallelujah thought that if she kept her head down, pastor's son Luke, the popular boy she once crushed on, would stop bullying her and spreading humiliating lies about what happened between them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Throw in some smugglers, a few villagers, and a trusty stable lad, and you've got yourself a tale that quite a few readers will like, but shouldn't. (Fiction. 10-15)"
An archetype of children's horse literature is the child (abused/ignored/misunderstood, preferably also an orphan) who rescues and tames the untamable horse (abused/misunderstood/ignored) and by doing so achieves glory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Meticulous history illuminated and animated by personal passion, carried aloft by volant prose."
The biographer of two great Romantics (Shelley and Coleridge) relates yet another romantic tale—the story of the human passion to fly up, up and away in a beautiful balloon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Daddy Will Fix It by Arlie Holmes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2015

"A bleak book with a sympathetic protagonist."
A debut novel about the trials and tribulations of a gifted, sensitive boy growing up in the bleak, unforgiving environment of the Virginia Mountains. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONSENSE by Jamie Holmes
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"The author's bright anecdotes and wide-ranging research stories are certain to please many readers."
New America Foundation Future Tense fellow Holmes, a former research coordinator in the department of economics at Harvard, debuts with a provocative analysis of the roots of uncertainty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Almost by itself, this thin historical record makes the case for Baartman's wholesale exploitation, and Holmes would have done better to let that silence speak rather than freight the final chapters with a hopelessly muddled 'significance' the story will not bear out."
The story of Saartjie Baartman, a kidnapped South African who briefly created a sensation in Europe. Read full book review >