Search Results: "Mary-Joan Gerson"


BOOK REVIEW

WHY THE SKY IS FAR AWAY by Mary-Joan Gerson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"The story may be centuries old, but it teaches a timely lesson and is retold in a lively, nonpreachy way. (Folklore/Picture book. 6-8)"
Once the sky was so close that people could reach up and break off pieces of it to eat, but they wasted so much that the sky grew angry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW NIGHT CAME FROM THE SEA by Mary-Joan Gerson
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A beautiful book that will find many uses. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A creation tale recorded by Elsie Spicer Eells in Fairy Tales from Brazil (1917). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEOPLE OF CORN by Mary-Joan Gerson
adapted by Mary-Joan Gerson, illustrated by Carla Golembe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Useful; bound to leave readers wanting more. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
The third book by these collaborators (How Night Came from the Sea, 1994, etc.) is a Mayan creation myth—accompanied by colorful, primitive paintings—prefaced first by an author's note, and then by details on the Maya's respect for corn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIESTA FEMENINA by Mary-Joan Gerson
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A celebration not only of the strength and complexity of Mexican women, but of the richness, vibrancy, and miraculous qualities of Mexican culture. (Folklore. 8+)"
Drawing on rich strands of Mexican culture, these smoothly told folktales celebrate women, ranging from mythical goddesses to the historical Malintzen (a.k.a. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 1999

THE LEAP YEARSWomen Reflect on Change, Loss, and LoveMaier, Mary Anne & Joan Shaddox Isom—Eds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ESSENTIAL NEOCONSERVATIVE READER by Mark Gerson
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1996

"Uncommonly sensible and civil discourses from a bridge group whose ideas are fast entering the mainstream, if not the realm of conventional wisdom."
An impressive sampler of improbably influential essays that in the aggregate suggest neoconservatism is more a sensibility than a coherent political doctrine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"This has many parallels with Linette Creen's book on Miami Cuban cooking, A Taste of Cuba (1991); but where Creen's book has an audience, this second take should also. (Eight-page color insert and 30 halftones—not seen.)"
Randelman emigrated to the US at age ten in 1957—and still rhapsodizes over the paradise she knew as a privileged child in pre-Castro Cuba. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 28, 1993

"In spite of the limited and slanted population sampling: a persuasively argued, sympathetic contribution to the growing literature of male liberation."
In a vivid, precise, but limited study, Gerson (Sociology/ N.Y.U.) extends to men the problems she explored in Hard Choices (1985), a study of women's dilemmas with family and career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DISASTER FALLS by Stéphane Gerson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"An unflinchingly honest, moving memoir of loss and recovery."
How the author and his family overcame the loss of a child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 17, 1991

"Loosely joined, dulled by a siege mentality, and overstuffed with excerpts from UN meetings—but nevertheless an informed view of the neoconservative mind-set in American diplomatic circles during Reagan's first term."
A firsthand account of the perils of American diplomacy at the UN during Jeane Kirkpatrick's tenure, written from Gerson's position as her expert in international law. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATHWATCH '39 by Jack Gerson
Released: Jan. 9, 1990

Ernest Lohmann, the honorable ex-Berlin Police Inspector who escaped to England one step ahead of the Gestapo (Death's Head Berlin and Death Squad London), is now asked by Whitehall to "babysit" Capt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 7, 1997

"Engaging anecdotes of a school year, leading to a thoughtful exploration of what urban and suburban cultures can learn from each other."
The first-person account of a neophyte history teacher in an inner-city high school: White, Republican, Ivy League, he epitomizes The Man to his mostly black and Hispanic students. Read full book review >