Search Results: "Marylouise Oates"


BOOK REVIEW

MAKING PEACE by Marylouise Oates
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1991

"Oates manages to convey the excitement and complexity of political warfare competently enough, but her characters remain shallow stereotypes—rendering this a largely forgettable journey into the past."
Another rehash of 60's politics—now in a debut novel by a former Deputy National Press Director for the Vietnam Moratorium, featuring, not surprisingly, the press secretary for a 1967 Washington peace march and her scary brush with the CIA. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPITOL OFFENSE by Barbara Mikulski
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Ultimately, everything rides on the plucky Gorzack, and the senator's shoulders aren't wide enough for the load."
From Mikulski, US senator from Maryland (Democrat), and Oates (Making Peace, 1991), a feeble attempt at a Washington suspense novel that reads like a hand-me-down episode of Murder, She Wrote. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPITOL VENTURE by Barbara Mikulski
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 30, 1997

"A few set pieces on congressional hearings and other aspects of partisan politics aside: another exercise in capital—that is, Beltway—punishment."
Despite a notably unpromising debut (Capitol Offense, 1996), US Senator Mikulski carries on with a series that pits a fictive counterpart against homicidal freebooters in and out of Washington. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WARREN OATES by Susan Compo
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2009

"An informative, welcome portrait of an underappreciated American icon."
Never quite a star, actor's actor Warren Oates gets his due in a lively biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JOURNAL OF JOYCE CAROL OATES by Joyce Carol Oates
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2007

"'Love. Friendship. Art. Work. These are my values,' Oates says. Watching her juggle them in these replete pages is a stimulating experience."
Tensions between public image and private self are engagingly acknowledged and analyzed in illuminating excerpts from journals begun during the second decade of this prolific author's remarkable career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOURLAND by Joyce Carol Oates
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"Oates being Oates. Let the reader beware."
More of (mostly) the same in Oates's latest collection of 16 in-your-face short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Erin's Song by M.T. Oates
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 26, 2013

"A brief novel with lovely prose and lively characters, but hampered by an occasionally moralistic tone."
Oates' first novel delivers a warm love story that mixes music with questions of morality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Although her material can be macabre, mawkish and deeply unsettling, Oates' hypnotic prose ensures that readers will be unable to look away."
Another gallery of grotesquerie from the staggeringly prolific Oates. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEASTS by Joyce Carol Oates
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"It's not subtle, but it works. Whenever Oates (Middle Age, p. 970, etc.) composes at this length, she doesn't pad or overwrite. The result is a cunning fusion of Gothic romance and psychological horror story, and one of her best recent books."
Oates's newest novella is a tale of academe similar to (though darker than) such earlier books as The Hungry Ghosts (1974) and American Appetites (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 15, 2005

"Nonetheless, it's useful to know what good writers are reading and thinking about, and if Oates the critic doesn't always dazzle, she seldom disappoints."
A seventh collection of the tireless Oates's industrious literary journalism: 38 recent reviews and essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"An ambitious but disappointing history whose drama arises from the historical facts, not from its freehanded embellishment of them."
An epic but deeply flawed Civil War history (the second volume of a planned trilogy) suffers from the fictional techniques it employs, while benefiting little from that genre's potential narrative punch. Read full book review >