Search Results: Mathea Morais


BOOK REVIEW

THERE YOU ARE by Mathea Morais
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 2019

"A novel that effectively intertwines ruminations on race, music, romance, and history. "
Two St. Louis residents, united by music and a local record store, fall in love in Morais' nostalgic debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. NOAH'S POCKETS by Jackie Morris
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2018

"With themes relevant to today's international struggles over exclusion, scarcity, and prejudice, this reinvention is a beautiful and necessary parable for our time. (Picture book/religion. 4-8)"
In an adaptation of the popular Bible story, readers meet Mrs. Noah, who has sewn deep pockets into her coat as Mr. Noah prepares the ark. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: Aug. 6, 1979

Morris the moose puts himself to sleep—or to sheep, as friend Boris has it after a verbal runaround with Little Bo-Peep—but the Mother Moose bedtime stories elicit only protests and corrections from Boris the bear. Morris' tale of the four bears—Papa, Mama, Baby, and Boris—is abandoned shortly after Goldi-locks' arrival; and what with Boris' reminders that a moose can't run up the clock or lay a golden egg, none of the other stories get off the ground. Unlike previous Morris and Boris exchanges, this one revolves less on Boris' failure to catch on than on Morris' failure to amuse him with his feeble word play. Kids in the same punchy state might succumb to the slap-happy mixups; most will concede that Morris can indeed lay an egg. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

A MATTER OF MORALS by Joseph Gies
Released: Feb. 28, 1950

A second novel (They Never Had It So Good) which is much less of a roughhouse and contributes some intramural insights and defeated conclusions on a university campus where younger ideals jar against vested interests. In the independence of the Arrowhead, the student daily, when it airs the expulsion of three students- politically suspect, and later a local strike, several are involved:- the Dean, who uses suppressive strategies to see conservative controls sustained; Philip Slidell, a reporter, who muffs his chance at the editorship; Victor Townsend, a professor, not too happily married and not too happily engaged in an affair, who loses his chance at the department chair when he refuses to interfere in the throttling of the Arrowhead... An object lesson in the destruction of values by expedient pressures, this makes its point, which is not a new one. Read full book review >