Search Results: "Matt Beam"


BOOK REVIEW

LAST DECEMBER by Matt Beam
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"As readers begin to realize the novel might be an extended suicide note, they will be captivated by Steven's journey to find meaning in a universe where only god with a small g is behind it all. (Fiction. YA)"
Even though he thinks the universe is crazy, aimless and chaotic, 15-year-old Steven is composing a letter to his yet-unborn sister Sam, so when she reads it, she'll see, in chronological order, all of the connections and causes and effects in his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY ALPHABET by Joanne Schwartz
NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"It will certainly have readers seeing their own cities with new eyes. (Picture book. 10 & up)"
Almost an artist's book rather than a book for children, this artfully constructed alphabet book holds its strength in design rather than beauty, although a few of the images are incidentally beautiful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING TO FIRST BASE WITH DANALDA CHASE by Matt Beam
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"Using baseball terms as his chapter headings, followed by definitions, Beam has managed to write a story that is fresh, funny and appealing to lovers and lovers of baseball, both male and female. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Using baseball as a guide for dating, Beam, in his U.S. debut, hits a grand-slam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN YOU SPELL REVOLUTION? by Matt Beam
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Though the narrative is mediocre, the theme of peaceful conflict resolution is important in today's acrimonious environment. (Fiction. 12-14)"
The mission: Depose the principal without divisions among friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY NUMBERS by Joanne Schwartz
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 2011

"Like the first, this is more an artist's book than one for little children, but it does effectively invite readers to enjoy close and repeated examination of the form, shape and whimsy of numbers. (Picture book. 10 & up)"
The team that gave us City Alphabet (2009) takes on urban numbers in the same inventive way, still holding readers at a slight emotional distance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM J by Cris Beam
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2011

"It was just good and bad and interesting and fucked-up and very human, like anything else.' (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Finally, a book about a transgender teen that gives its central character a life in which gender and transition matter but do not define his existence! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMERICANS ARE COMING! by Alex Beam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1991

"A mildly entertaining muddle that often relies too much on exaggeration, Mad magazine-fashion, to score its points about Russians and Americans."
Beam (Fellow Travelers, 1987) gets some rather obvious satirical mileage—but not many laughs—out of his second novel, this one about selling the American Way in a dusty corner of conquered Russia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 10, 2008

"An engaging personal examination of a phenomenon that merits more scholarly attention."
Boston Globe columnist Beam (Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America's Premier Mental Hospital, 2001, etc.) takes a witty look at the publishing program that aimed to bring high culture to the masses…or at least the aspiring middle class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"An admirable institutional history, and more so, a captivating social history, for what makes McLean distinctive, its style and sensibility, is part and parcel of what Boston, as a cultural instance, represents. (Photographs)"
A history of America's best-known insane asylum for the carriage trade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 2014

"A fascinating history that, while particularly appealing to those interested in religion, is sure to inform a far wider audience."
An account of the Illinois Mormon settlement Nauvoo and the events that precipitated the church's flight to Utah. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PIRATE MEETS THE QUEEN by Matt Faulkner
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"The details may differ, but this rendition is just as stirring as Emily Arnold McCully's The Pirate Queen (1995), and will leave readers awash in admiration for its self-assured narrator. (source list) (Picture book. 8-10)"
Embroidering his first-person historical tale a bit ("It's the way of storytelling," says he in a closing note), Faulkner recounts the exploits of fierce Irish pirate Granuaile (more often known as Grace, or Grania) O'Malley, from birth, through early buccaneering, to a climactic, intrepid face-off with fiery Queen Elizabeth—here dubbed "Red Liz"—after her piratical son's capture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIP FLOP BOP by Matt Novak
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2005

"Fun for fans of flip-flops and summer. (Picture book. 3-7)"
What better way to herald the end of school and the start of summer than by ditching shoes and socks and donning flip-flops? Read full book review >