Search Results: "Matt Samet"


BOOK REVIEW

DEATH GRIP by Matt Samet
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"Given the widespread nature of prescription-drug abuse, the book may prove useful to people facing similar circumstances, but reading it is a slog."
Turgid, overstuffed account of overcoming prescription-drug addiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUFFTON by Matt Phelan
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 23, 2013

"Thrilling—a spirited, poignant coming-of-age vignette and an intriguing window into a little-known chapter in vaudeville history. (art not seen in full color) (author's note) (Graphic historical fiction. 9-12)"
In this winsome, sparely spun graphic novel by Phelan (The Storm in the Barn, 2011), Henry Harrison gets a tantalizing taste of the outside world when a young Buster Keaton and more vacationing vaudevillians tumble into his small Michigan town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVER’S GAME by Matt Tavares
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"An intimate, poignant episode for fans who revel in the game's less tangible aspects. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The author of Zachary's Ball (2000) offers another tale of baseball dreams passing from one generation to another, grafted to atmospheric pencil illustrations that recall Chris Van Allsburg's early work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENRY AARON’S DREAM by Matt Tavares
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 12, 2010

"Very fine. (author's note, stats, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 8-12)"
This book opens with a stark image: Readers look through a chain-link fence at white boys playing ball, a large WHITES ONLY sign dead center. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EVERYTHING MACHINE by Matt Novak
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Dystopian allegory, lively storytelling, giggle-worthy pictures, boy appeal—yup: Everything's here. (Picture book. 4-8)"
On the planet Quirk, the Everything Machine gradually supplants both the drudgery and creativity of the populace, which on most days "just stayed in bed." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 2012

"A baseball hero and an American hero, the last player to hit over .400 in a season; here, Ted Williams is introduced to a new generation of baseball fans. (author's note, statistics, bibliography) (Picture book/ biography. 6-10)"
Ted Williams' goal was, as the subtitle suggests, to be the greatest hitter who ever lived. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIR REGINALD’S LOGBOOK by Matt Hammill
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Who dares follow? (Picture book. 6-8)"
A legend in his own mind, bushy-mustached Sir Reginald braves harrowing perils (not) in search of the fabled "Lost Tablet of Illusion." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WISH FOR YOU by Matt Novak
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

"A sweetly packaged view that a family of three beats two! (Picture book. 1-5)"
In this lighthearted chronicle of the making of a family, text and art deliver an affirmative message. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORM IN THE BARN by Matt Phelan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"This is not to be missed. (Graphic fiction. 9-14)"
Eleven-year-old Jack Clark feels useless on his family's Kansas farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOME BIRDS by Matt Spink
by Matt Spink, illustrated by Matt Spink
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2016

"Endearing and great fun to share. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Simple rhymes in bold print cavort among kaleidoscopic images of birds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOW WHITE by Matt Phelan
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Brilliant. (Graphic adaptation. 9 & up)"
Imagined through a 1920s lens, "Snow White" unfolds as a graphic novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPENT by Joe Matt
by Joe Matt, illustrated by Joe Matt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2007

"Not for kids, though adult readers should take some pleasure knowing that they're better off than Matt, at least as depicted here."
The cartoonist tests the limits of pathetic self-absorption in a volume that should appeal to his cult following but is unlikely to expand it. Read full book review >