Search Results: "Matthew Alexander"


BOOK REVIEW

MATTHEW A.B.C. by Peter Catalanotto
ABC BOOKS
Released: June 1, 2002

"A stunning play of art and verbal imagination. (Picture book. 4-6)"
The backgrounds to the illustrations in Catalanotto's inspired alphabet book may remind readers of Mark Rothko's paintings, but the portraits of the characters in the foregrounds of the bifurcated color fields are uniformly droll. Mrs. Tuttle's kindergarten class has 25 students, all named Matthew, and most with jug ears and gap-toothed smiles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING RID OF MATTHEW by Jane Fallon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Fallon's debut is sharp enough, but a languishing plot dulls the author's wit."
The other woman attempts to make amends in this debut novel from Fallon, a U.K. television producer and partner of comedian Ricky Gervais. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN by Andrew Wilson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Wilson ably and unsparingly portrays the heady, competitive, solipsistic world that celebrated, and ultimately doomed, McQueen."
The astonishing creations and tormented life of British fashion designer Alexander McQueen (1969-2010). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MATTHEW UNSTRUNG by Kate Seago
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Uneven but often engrossing. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A harrowing, if roughly constructed debut, based on the experiences of the author's grandfather; this tale of a student with a learning disability who is driven into a nervous breakdown is set in the early years of this century, when treatment of insanity was still firmly fixed in the Dark Ages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A sympathetic and judicious appraisal that will deepen the understanding of this remarkable man."
A slightly odd but ultimately very satisfying biography of a man who, in terms of political and historical impact, has been called ``the dominant writer of this century.'' George Kennan described The Gulag Archipelago as ``the most powerful single indictment of a political regime ever to be levelled in modern times.'' The irony is that the indictment came not from the West, but from a heroic survivor of the Gulag. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 20, 2009

"Honest and inspiring."
A mother's memoir of her young son, his murder and the effect on a galvanized public. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MATTHEW WHEELOCK'S WALL by Frances Ward Weller
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"Truly outstanding in every way: a book of rare insight and beauty. (Picture book. 4+)"
Old Matthew and his horse cleared a pasture, 100 years ago, putting the biggest rocks in a trench and saving the others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEXANDER HAMILTON by Jean Fritz
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"The volume comes to an unfortunately perfunctory conclusion with Hamilton's death in his duel with Aaron Burr, though source notes add interesting additional reading. (Biography. 9-12)"
His enemies may have called him an outsider, but Alexander Hamilton was loyal to his adopted country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEXANDER HAMILTON by Willard Sterne Randall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2003

"A sturdy and readable life, in company with Randall's other portraits of the Revolutionary generation."
A revealing but measured biography of the younger Founding Father, who, to the horror of libertarians ever since, "[drew] up a blueprint for a relationship between government and money." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEING ALEXANDER by Nancy Sparling
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2002

"Readable and funny, though it turns a little mushy in the end."
A first novel that fulfills almost every revenge fantasy ever dreamed of—about a young man who overcomes his shyness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, MATTHEW HENSON by Carole Boston Weatherford
ADVENTURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Lovely and inspiring. (Picture book/biography. 6-11)"
A poetic first-person narrative puts readers in Matthew Henson's head as he endures institutionalized discrimination to pursue greatness in adventure, moving from cabin boy to able seaman, stock boy to explorer, eventually one of "[s]ix men—one black, one white, four Eskimos—" to reach the North Pole in 1909. Read full book review >