Search Results: "Maureen Ogle"


BOOK REVIEW

IN MEAT WE TRUST by Maureen Ogle
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"An informative and entertaining narrative of the complexities of a massive industry, in which the author lays bare Americans' sense of entitlement and insistence on cheap and abundant meat and questions what that voracious appetite has wrought on our bodies and the environment."
Historian Ogle (Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Beer, 2006, etc.) explores the historical foundations and inaccuracies surrounding the story of the industry that supplies the beef, chicken and pork to America's carnivorous multitudes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 2, 2006

"A beer garden of a book that leaves no stein unturned."
From kegs to bottles to cans, the making and selling of beer encapsulates in various ways the larger history of American taste and how business catered to it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEAN, MEAN MAUREEN GREEN by Judy Cox

BOOK REVIEW

OTTERS by Adrienne Mason
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Since otters of either variety are seldom found in most neighborhoods, precision in identification may be less than critical and appealing illustrations will attract beginning readers. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
A pleasant introduction to North American river otters and their larger cousins, the sea otters, with colored drawings on every page and an easy-to-read text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEXT OF KIN by Maureen Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2016

"Sarah grows from an idea to a more fully realized character in this fourth installment of a series (Child's Play, 2014, etc.) that may just be hitting its stride."
A detective investigating a string of sex crimes senses that the key may be found in understanding her own biases against the perpetrators. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DYING BAD by Maureen Carter
Released: March 1, 2013

"The dialogue Carter (Mother Love, 2012, etc.) provides between the enemies-turned-collaborators is so snappy that readers may well forgive the lack of narrative drive."
Fast-talking enemies must join forces to stop the leader of a child prostitution ring from striking again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER LOVE by Maureen Carter
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Carter (A Question of Despair, 2011, etc.) delivers another well-turned procedural, with the Quinn/King relationship better developed than in her last installment."
A missing woman reignites the fires of animosity between an icy detective and a scheming reporter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME by Maureen McCarthy
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2008

"Older teens just stepping into adulthood will recognize and appreciate Rose's authentic transformative experiences. (Fiction. YA)"
Rose's road trip up the Australian coast invokes flashbacks from the previous year, when her parents' marriage, plans for college and best friendship all fell apart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A JOURNEYMAN TO GRIEF by Maureen Jennings
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2007

"A surprisingly tender tale of slavery, addiction, violence and revenge served ice-cold. "
An interrupted 19th-century honeymoon ends 38 years later in a violent outburst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

B-MOTHER by Maureen O’Brien
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 5, 2007

"An earnest and plodding narrative whose heroine comes across as a whiny victim, much put upon by cold parents, a caddish boyfriend and spoiled college acquaintances."
A teenaged girl has a baby out of wedlock in the 1970s and spends the next 18 years waiting to see if her happily adopted son will seek her out, in this first novel that reads like an updated Joan Crawford movie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARE MEN NECESSARY? by Maureen Dowd
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 2005

"Her heart's in the right place, but she really should get out more."
After sticking it to the administration in Bushworld (2004), New York Times Pulitzer-winner Dowd takes on the battle of the sexes. Read full book review >