Search Results: "Maurice Gee"


BOOK REVIEW

MAURICE by Mary Shelley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 1998

"Tomalin's fine introduction notwithstanding, there's nothing here that merits the attention—preface, introduction, annotations, notes, bibliography—it's being given."
A children's tale, written in 1820 but only lately discovered, now published for the first time with an introduction by English biographer and critic Tomalin (Jane Austen, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAURICE by E.M. Forster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 1971

"The book ultimately becomes a literary curio, perhaps socially useful (prominent figures make the gay world a little more respectable) but uninteresting except as a historical document to people hip enough to realize that a person's sexual preference isn't all that important, or, once the shouting is over and the novelty accepted, even terribly interesting."
It is tempting to suggest that E. M. Forster should have left his long heralded and posthumously published novel about homosexual love back where it belonged, a little before the First World War, fifty years before Gay Lib and the Wolfenden Report. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALT by Maurice Gee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Admirable characters confronting human realities make for compelling reading. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
In a fantasy world populated by evil colonizers, two children make a fresh start. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOL by Maurice Gee
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"The fascinating buildup leads to a thrilling climax, followed by a bizarrely flat conclusion—perhaps preparing readers for the next volume. (Fantasy. 13-15)"
A generation after the events of Salt (2009), Hari and Pearl have raised their children (both biological and adopted) in freedom far from the nightmarish city of their own birth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHAMPION by Maurice Gee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"A lively, idiosyncratic cast keeps the story moving; and while it's less intensely suspenseful than Gee's The Fire-Raiser (1992), it's another likable, thoughtful examination of wartime pressures and prejudices in a small, vividly portrayed New Zealand community. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In New Zealand in 1943, wounded American GIs were invited to local homes to convalesce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRE-RAISER by Maurice Gee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A well-wrought thriller that brings an entire community vividly and believably to life. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In his first children's book to be published here, a well- regarded New Zealand novelist sets a story about four children bringing a pyromaniac to justice early in WW I. From its riveting first chapter—from the point of view of the lumbering masked man who sets fire to the local livery stable because ``a time had come when his fire must consume life''—the action is compelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIMPING MAN by Maurice Gee
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2011

"Fantasy heroes who can save only themselves and their loved ones are a welcome change from the usual. (Fantasy. 13-15)"
The Salt trilogy closes with a third generation of children fighting petty but dangerous evils. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FAT MAN by Maurice Gee
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Sobering and scary. (Fiction. 12-15)"
In an ugly, menacing psycho-thriller set in Depression-era New Zealand, a man returns to his small town to repay the bullies who sent him fleeing 13 years before. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEE WHIZ! by Susan E. Goodman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Resource list at the nether end. (Nonfiction. 6-9)"
Hoping for a follow-up to The Truth about Poop (2004)? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAURICE THE HIPPO by Maarten Bos
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The story may not exhibit much follow-through, but the large simple figures situated on vivid backgrounds and the poking about of the hippo all the way to his birthday party will have preschoolers eager for each turn of the page. (Board book. 2-5)"
This brightly hued board book follows the meanderings of a merry hippo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAURICE SENDAK'S REALLY ROSIE STARRING THE NUTSHELL KIDS by Maurice Sendak
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Nov. 13, 1975

Based on the exuberant television special of the same name, which was itself based on The Nutshell Library and The Sign on Rosie's Door (with some illustrations reminiscent of In the Night Kitchen), this brings together script (which includes the four Nutshell rhymes), score, and stills for both those who missed the show and those who are sorry it's over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAURICE THE UNBEASTLY by Amy Dixon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"An urbane take on the 'nice monster' theme. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A misfit monster comes into his own when the Abominable Academy for Brutish Beasts is invaded by a scary creature. Read full book review >