Search Results: "Mavis Jukes"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GUY BOOK by Mavis Jukes
HEALTH
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A good bet for open-minded parents, teachers of health and sex education classes, and all libraries. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Designed like an owner's manual for a teenager's car, this lively guide offers tips on "safety, maintenance, and operating instructions" for boys' bodies and relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAVIS by Brenda K. Marshall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 1996

"Mavis might as well be named Martyr, and since the murderer is revealed in the first few pages, the suspense is practically nonexistent."
With a key family member's imminent death, a history of long- buried abuse, and lightly veiled sisterly resentment, Marshall's spotty debut resonates with echoes of Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres as five sisters must come to terms with a dark secret and a mysterious murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW KID by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 13, 2011

"Quiet humor with dashes of goofiness may offset its problems, but Carson's tale will still work better as a read-aloud than as an independent read. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Being the "new kid" in the middle of a school year means all sorts of new experiences for 8-year-old Carson Blum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMOKE by Mavis Jukes
ANIMALS
Released: April 2, 2009

"It's a tender, audience-appropriate story that subtly handles themes of home, family and community. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Much has changed in 12-year-old Colton's life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLANNING THE IMPOSSIBLE by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1999

A little—very little—information about male sexual organs and plenty of classroom intrigue keep sixth grader River embarrassed, confused, and angry in this airy sequel to Expecting the Unexpected (1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD IRIS BLOOM by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1992

"Caught by Iris's entertainingly outrageous pranks, readers will stay to enjoy the warm interaction with Maggie's sensible parents and especially between the girls: Maggie, a true friend, concludes by tactfully helping the chagrined Iris to get back on track. (Fiction. 10-14)"
With her parents in Europe, Iris (Maggie's irrepressible best friend in Getting Even, 1988) is so weary of her oblivious babysitter that she keeps news of their delayed return secret and sends Mrs. Fuller on her way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXPECTING THE UNEXPECTED by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

From Jukes (I'll See You in My Dreams, 1993, etc.), sixth- grade comedy vÇritÇ: Sex-educated to the max, River is awaiting her first period (which she doesn't get). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GROWING UP by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Jukes's common sense extends to many aspects of girls' health, reminding them to take good care of their bodies, eat well, and relax—there is plenty of time to think and learn about growing up. (b&w illustrations, index, not seen) (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
This informative and direct book for pre-pubescent girls discusses everything they'll want to know about—periods, bras, tampons, breasts, cramps, etc.—in an age-appropriate manner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"Expressing with unusual strength the complexity a child's thoughts may have at such a time, a deeply felt book with potential for comforting or for opening communication. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The first half of this depiction of a child's intensity in imagining an upcoming visit to a dying uncle (a former pilot) is a fantasy beginning with ``If she were a skywriter'' and going on to detail the girl's piloting a plane to write a message across a beautiful sunset: ``Good-bye—I love you—I'll see you in my dreams.'' Then, still in a poignant conditional tense, Jukes describes what may really happen (``her mother would say, `He might not even know you're there' ''); though only ``a little kid,'' the child resolves to brave the uncertainties because she would know she was there, and she'd know what to say. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LARKY MAVIS by Brock Cole
by Brock Cole, illustrated by Brock Cole
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 3, 2001

From the author of Buttons (2000) comes a simply told tale with deep emotional and metaphorical resonance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF MAVIS GALLANT by Mavis Gallant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1996

"A book whose time has come, showcasing the work of a master who should finally be recognized as such. (15,000 first printing)"
The Collected Stories Of Mavis Gallant ($45.00; Sept. 24, 1996; 1200 pp.; 0-679-44886-1): A huge and imposingly accomplished collection- -the sort that calls for our immediate reassessment of a writer's career—displaying more than a half-century of work from the Canadian-born Francophile whose wry explorations of alienation and culture conflict typify the kind of sophistication associated with the New Yorker (where virtually all of these 52 tales first appeared). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU’RE A BEAR by Mavis Jukes
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 9, 2003

"A natural for bedtime sharing, with a rhythmic, partly rhymed text, cozily soft-lined illustrations with plush-like painted surfaces, and a subtly presented backstory. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A young child puts on a parent-sized hooded coat and presto—she's a grizzly bear, squeezing between living room "boulders," rambling through a "midnight breeze" from the refrigerator ("You're a bold bear / with a nose as cold as cheese . . . Read full book review >