Search Results: "Max Barry"


BOOK REVIEW

LEXICON by Max Barry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2013

"An up-all-night thriller for freaks and geeks who want to see their wizards all grown up in the real world and armed to the teeth in a bloody story."
Modern-day sorcerers fight a war of words in this intensely analytical yet bombastic thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACHINE MAN by Max Barry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2011

"Though this novel is notably darker than his other books, Barry still finds a smirking and at times uproarious way to expose our endless obsession with technological fixes."
A timid scientist becomes a military-grade bionic man in the latest corporate satire from Barry (Jennifer Government, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMPANY by Max Barry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 17, 2006

"Comic relief for any b-school grads (or Office Space fans) who've had their fill of Collins, Drucker and Peters."
A raucous black comedy about corporate management that's tailor-made for anybody who's ever gone to the office feeling like a lab rat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYRUP by Max Barry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1999

"A bit too slick, but funny and fast all the same: about as filling as cotton candy, but just as sweet going down."
A rollicking debut about a cola marketing campaign that takes on Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and corporate America in one perfectly executed triple play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNIFER GOVERNMENT by Max Barry
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"It's Catch-22 by way of The Matrix."
Bubblegum pop-future comedy in which corporations go to war like feudal fiefdoms. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BARRY LYGA
by Megan Labrise

What’s Barry Lyga’s secret to writing books teen readers love?

“I don’t write for teens,” says the New York Times bestselling author of I Hunt Killers. “That’s my secret—I write about teens.

“I’m aware that my books are published as YA,” he continues, “and I love that, and there’s a magic to having teenagers tell you a book ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

EXTREME OPPOSITES by Max Dalton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"With whole stories unfurling in each image, the book has potential for classroom use as well as for solo enjoyment. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A witty, sophisticated book of opposites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ACCIDENTAL ZUCCHINI by Max Grover
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Attractive, if not essential. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Grover's first is ``An Unexpected Alphabet,'' with pairings (``Fork fence''; ``Vegetable volcano'') that occasion amusing surreal paintings in crayon-bright colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX'S WACKY TAXI DAY by Max Grover
HUMOR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Grover's intense palette and artwork have instant appeal, but the vibrant colors are doing all the work and can't compensate for the stodgy text. (Picture book. 7+)"
Grover (Circles and Squares Everywhere!, 1996, etc.) mines wordplay with plenty of energy and color, but the sequence of events, concepts, and images are forced and clanky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ME FIRST by Max Kornell
by Max Kornell, illustrated by Max Kornell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 15, 2014

"As soothing on the eyes as it is, potentially, on the nerves. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Being first is only fun—if it can be called fun—when it doesn't entail learning the rude consequences of the unknown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKLEMONSTER AND ME by Max Haynes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 9, 1999

"There is little doubt that these stage directions will be only a jumping-off point for most readers; just in case the story is not provocative enough, there are additional games included. (Picture book. 2-7)"
Haynes (In the Driver's Seat, 1997, etc.) has produced a visual script for a ticklefest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLES AND SQUARES EVERYWHERE! by Max Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"An eye-catching elementary introduction to the notion, also found in Dayle Ann Dodds's The Shape of Things (1994, not reviewed), that these basic shapes can be found everywhere. (Picture book. 3-5)"
There is no shortage of picture books featuring geometric shapes, but surely this is one of the brightest. Read full book review >